Unit 8.6: Frayer Models Vocabulary List: Continuously Updated, Start Date: January 29, 2020, Due Date: TBA, As We Approach the End Unit 8.6.

DO COMPLETE DURING WINTER BREAK!!!!!

Students: The following is the list of vocabulary for our Unit 8.6 that will be continuously updated. This means that you will need to check this list every couple of days for updated new terms that will be added, as we learn them in class through our study of the second unit, Unit 8.6.

Avoid waiting for the last few days to begin your work on the terms below. Therefore, the classroom teacher suggests that you get cracking now. This means today, Thursday, January 09, 2020.

Remember that each Frayer model must include the definition of the term, its characteristics, an example, and a non-example. Note that if an example is not available to you, a picture can be sketched to represent the concept that you are working on.

1. natural hazard

2. tornado

3. hurricane

4. earthquake

5. volcanic eruption

6. flood

7. forecast

8. natural hazard forecast

9. risk

10. frequency

11. magnitude

12. severity

13. storm surge

14. Saffir-Simpson scale

15. impact

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.

21.

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Unit 8.6, Lessons 3 & 4: Scores Posted

Students, there were 26% A’s (13 students) and B’s (21 students) with a whole bunch of C’s. If you scored between 12.5 and 14, you earned a C.

Overall, we can do better, since many of the B’s should have nailed the A, and many of the C’s should have reached the B level.

Many of you failed to express the unit running theme in your closing argument, and that was worth 2 summative points.

Ask yourself: How many times did we mention it, not to mention, how many times have we had it on our bellwork?

Do you think you should know it for the Unit 8.6 test toward the end of March 2020?

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I. Videos, Photos, and Other References

ALASKA: Videos or pictures of most damaging natural hazard events

Hazard TypeDate of Most Damaging EventLink to Video or Pictures of the Event
FloodAug 1967Alaska’s Digital Archives (1967)  “Fairbanks 1967 flood photographs” http://vilda.alaska.edu/cdm/ref/collection/cdmg11/id/35056
EarthquakeMarch 28, 1964Youtube User “historycomestolife” (2014) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sm5cNk7VAs
Volcanic EruptionJune 6, 1912Youtube User “Baranov Museum (2013) “Katmai1 Eruption by Marina Cummiskey” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgkU_qol6a0

Additional information:

Hazard TypeDate of Most Damaging EventMagnitude of EventDeaths and Economic Loss from the Event
FloodAug 1967(not applicable)6 deaths Cost: $85 million
EarthquakeMarch 28, 19649.215 deathsCost: $284 million
Volcanic EruptionJune 6, 1912 VEI 6
(Volcanic
Eruption
Index)
No deaths and minimal damages
  1. The erupting volcano was later determined to be Novarupta.

CALIFORNIA: Videos or pictures of most damaging natural hazard events

Hazard TypeDate of Most Damaging EventLink to Video or Pictures of the Event
FloodJan. – Feb. 1969Ventura Flood of ’69https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=za_GRuNZYaA&t=697s
Earthquake1906San Francisco Earthquake (1906)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tm9kqImgsxQFrom Youtube User “British Pathe” (2014) 
Tornado1983“The Los Angeles Tornado of 1983”http://www.welikela.com/last-tornado-los-angeles/ From Brian Chapman (2014)
Volcanic Eruption 1915 “Mt. Lassen 1915”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZD9K4q55jkFrom Youtube User “Shasta Historical Society” (2015) 

Additional information:

Hazard TypeDate of Most Damaging EventMagnitude of EventDeaths and Economic Loss from the Event
FloodJan. – Feb. 1969(not applicable)60 deaths, Cost: $400 million
Earthquake19067.9700 deaths, Cost: $400 million
Tornado1983Fujita 20 deaths, Cost: $25 million
Volcanic Eruption 1915 VEI 30 deaths, Cost: Less than $1 million

MICHIGAN: Videos or pictures of most damaging natural hazard events

Hazard TypeDate of Most Damaging EventLink to Video or Pictures of the Event
FloodSept. 10-15,1986MLive (2016), “55 amazing photos from the Great Flood of 1986”http://www.mlive.com/news/index.ssf/2016/09/see_55_photos_from_the_great_f.htmlWhat’s Up in the City of Midland | 1986 Floodhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Of2M6XR9MDwFrom Youtube User “City of Midland, Michigan” (2010) 
Earthquake8/9/19474.0-9.0 Magnitude Earthquake Simulation (watch 0:06-0:46)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bta1STQVsss&t=16s From Youtube User “jhweather” (2010) 
Tornado6/8/1953“In a Matter of Minutes” – The Flint-Beecher Tornado of 1953https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9F_J30XYcjYFrom Youtube User “David Cochrane” (2016) 

Additional information:

Hazard TypeDate of Most Damaging EventMagnitude of EventDeaths and Economic Loss from the Event
FloodSept. 10-15,1986(not applicable)6 deaths,Cost: $500 million
Earthquake8/9/19474.6No deaths Cost: Less than $100,000
Tornado6/8/1953Fujita 5116 deaths,Cost: $5 million – $50 million

SOUTH CAROLINA: Videos or pictures of most damaging natural hazard events

Hazard TypeDate of Most Damaging EventLink to Videos or Pictures of the Event
FloodJune 1903“The Pacolet River Flood of 1903”http://pacoletmemories.com/flood.htmlFloodinghttps://www.weather.gov/safety/flood-states-sc 
HurricaneSept 1989 Pawley’s Island, SC – Sept 1989 Aerial Footage of Hugo Aftermathhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3YHCliJljsHurricane Hugo 1989 Florence, SC with Tom Kinard radio commentaryhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=50UkLUzGYhE
TornadoApril 30, 1924Original images not available. This video is from an F4 Tornado in Washington, IL (2013)https://youtu.be/DG9wKqQJvLw

Additional information:

Hazard TypeDate of Most Damaging EventMagnitude DeathsEconomic Loss Cost in 2018 dollars (historical cost)
FloodJune 1903(not applicable)50 $101 million ($3.5 million in 1903)
HurricaneSept 1989  Category 413$14 billion ($7 billion in 1989)
TornadoApril 30, 1924Fujita 467$30 to 70 million ($2-5 million in 1924)

WASHINGTON: Videos or pictures of most damaging natural hazard events

Hazard TypeDate of Most Damaging EventLink to Video or Pictures of the Event
FloodJanuary 19971997 New Year’s flood devastated Northern Californiahttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mXEza6kPyFk
EarthquakeApr. 13, 1949Earthquake damage in Pioneer Square, Seattle, April 13, 1949
http://digitalcollections.lib.washington.edu/cdm/ref/collection/imlsmohai/id/613 
TornadoApril 5, 1972NWSPortland (2013)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1fq-sGhXMGo&t=124s 
Volcanic Eruption 1980The Mount St. Helens Volcano Eruption of 1980, Effects. From Natural Disaster to Natural Rebirth!!!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XauYr9vgz0From Youtube User “20th Century Time Machine” (2016) 

Additional information:

Hazard TypeDate of Most Damaging EventMagnitude of EventDeaths and Economic Loss from the Event
FloodJanuary 1997(not applicable)24 deaths,Cost: $140 million
EarthquakeApr. 13, 19498 deaths, Cost: $25 million
TornadoApril 5, 1972Fujita 36 deaths, Cost: $29.572 million
Volcanic Eruption 1980VEI 557 deaths, Cost: $2 billion 

Historic economic cost estimates adjusted to 2018 equivalents using http://www.in2018dollars.com

Sources for Data by state

South Carolina

Most destructive tornado: http://www.dnr.sc.gov/climate/sco/Publications/storms_of_centry.php

Horrell Hill Tornado Cost: http://www.dnr.sc.gov/climate/sco/ClimateData/HorrellHillTornado1924.pdf

Destructive Storm information: http://www.dnr.sc.gov/climate/sco/ClimateData/cli_sc_climate.php 

1984 tornado information: https://www.weather.gov/ilm/CarolinasOutbreak

Washington State

Natural Hazards:   https://waecy.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=8451cb0db0c4461182e592eb5a43400a

II. Here is the data link for the severe hazard event for your state:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1vst96PT0K2e-yVbqT918lhWKLnvYj28nkdkf4anGdXc/edit#gid=1325147077

III. Damages Caused by Hazards in Your State.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5M9ug8YpV-zTlA5aktfUVFkN1E/view?usp=sharing

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CHANGE IN PLANS: TEST ON LESSONS 3 AND 4 ON THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2020

After a careful study of our remaining sections for Lesson 4, it appears that there is only one more new concept to learn in this lesson that we can simply pick up on this coming Monday or Tuesday.

Our remaining focus in this lesson will be a C.E.R. that we have been practicing upon for the past several months, as well as we’ll be carrying out a data analysis in our packet to assist the governor of your assigned state.

Since the key ideas and main concepts will have been discussed sufficiently by Tuesday, we will be able to handle our test on Lessons 3 and 4 this coming Thursday.

A word of caution: Besides needing to review your material in the next five (5) calendar days, the classroom teacher highly recommends that you show up on Thursday, because should you be absent on test day, your makeup test of a different format will be scheduled for Friday, February 28, 2020, after school, which is fifteen (15) calendar days after our regular test, due to our Mid-Winter Break. Now, should you have already been planning on being absent this coming Thursday for whatever reason, then you need to arrange with your classroom teacher for you to show up on test day at 7:05 am to take the same test, with a 45-minute block up to 7:50 am, and then you are free to leave the building. If you are planning to be out of town and it is not possible for you to take the test at 7:05 am on Thursday, then your only other option is Friday, February 28, 2020.

Decide carefully and good luck!

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A Follow-up to Our Article: Australia is getting some desperately needed rain. A downpour knocked back a third of New South Wales fires in a day.

By David Williams, CNN

Updated 12:01 PM ET, Thu February 6, 2020

Firefighters in Australia have been battling the bushfires for months.

Firefighters in Australia have been battling the bushfires for months.

(CNN)Firefighters battling Australia’s devastating wildfires are getting some help from the weather in New South Wales.Here’s how to help Australia bushfire victimsHeavy rains have knocked back the number of active fires in the state by almost a third — in just one day, according to the New South Wales Rural Fire Service.There had been 62 active fires Wednesday night, with 20 not contained, according to the agency.That number dropped to 42 active fires by Thursday night, and only 17 not contained.”Today we were over the moon to see rain arrive across many parts of New South Wales, with decent fall in the State’s north. Fingers crossed we see this rainfall remain steady and reach the firegrounds in Southern NSW over the weekend,” officials wrote on Facebook.

Some 1,200 firefighters and support personnel were working to take advantage of the rainy conditions, they said.Some areas got about 4 to 6 inches (100 to 150 mm) of rain in 24 hours, and more rain was in the forecast for the southeastern coast of Australia.Rescued koalas named for fallen American firefightersA wide zone, from Brisbane down to Melbourne, could also get 4 to 6 inches of rain over the next several days, and there is a high risk of flooding this week, especially in coastal areas, the Bureau of Meteorology warns.Wildfires have killed more than 20 people and destroyed millions of acres of land since the fire season began in July. More than 1 billion animals have been killed across Australia, ecologists at the University of Sydney estimate.

CNN Meteorologist Haley Brink contributed to this story.

  • Source: CNN.com
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M-Step Practice for ELA: State Released Items

Students use the link below to practice for your ELA M-Step:

https://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,4615,7-140-22709_70117-456071–,00.html

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Friday, January 31, 2020: Videos Viewed

In case you missed any of the video(s) content, feel free to view them again and write down any pertinent information that you may have missed in class.

Next, view Hurricane Katrina from 2:55-8:13 (about 5 min.)

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Unit 8.6, Lesson 4: Key Concepts & Takeaways

The download attachments are for your reference purposes. They make useful study materials.

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Unit 8.6 : Unit Challenge Bubble Map

Students, look over your current bubble map of our Unit 8.6, and determine what questions we can answer now, and what other questions we can add to our map. This will be our focus on Monday. First, it will be individually done, then with your table group, and then followed by the whole class.

For genuine questions that are shared with the class, formative extra credit points may be earned. Many of you can use these points, since many of you have performed below average on our daily bellwork!

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Attention 3rd Hour Only!

Bellwork scores have been added to your running totals. Thus far, we have had 10 points for bellwork. We are slowly getting to be on-task. Keep it up!

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