English Language Arts First Quarter Evaluation

In English Language Arts, what are the advantages and disadvantages of remote learning? Would the two readings and writings, “Us and Them” and “The Hitchhiker,” have been better learning experiences had the lessons been in-person instead of remote? Evaluate the effort you put into both units. What have you learned? Grade yourself and explain how the grade reflects the effort you put into this class.

PSAT prep #6

The focus of PSAT prep #5 was on one aspect of recognizing sentences: how do you know whether a group of related words with a subject and verb is a sentence? It is not a sentence when it begins with a subordinating conjunction or a relative pronoun and the group of related words is not connected to an independent clause. Subordinating conjunctions were addressed in the last prep; today, relative pronouns.

PSAT prep 6

Relative pronouns are: that, which, who, whoever, whom, whomever, whose, what, and whatever.

For example,  “The book that Fatima left on the table was lost.”  The independent clause, the one that can stand alone, is “The book was lost” and is a sentence.  The subordinate clause beginning with a relative pronoun is “that Fatima left on the table” cannot stand alone and is not a sentence.

Consider the following sentences.  Identify the relative pronouns and the dependent clauses they begin:

  1. The assignment that Mr. Wojtys logged into Google Classroom was completed by every student.
  2. Mohammad is a student who always does his homework on time.
  3. Ayah has become the student to whom other students turn for help.
  4. Whoever wants to succeed in school can by completing the enrichment assignments and reading logs during the shutdown.
  5. The Lowrey spirit is what inspires all students.

Restate in your own words these key concepts: independent clause, subordinate clause, clause versus phrase, subordinating conjunction, relative pronoun.  Compose at least five sentences showing that you understand this lesson. Identify the independent clause, the dependent clause, and the relative pronoun.

Virtual Lab Work for Tuesday, October 27, 2020

By now you should have responded to PSAT preps #1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. If you have, begin working on #6. Remember to complete the PSAT preps on a document that will be submitted with the completion of #12. Do not submit the PSAT preps until all twelve have been completed and I ask that you submit them. Also, submit to Schoology the CERs for “Us and Them” and “The Hitchhiker.”

PSAT prep #5

The focus of PSAT prep #5 will be on one aspect of recognizing sentences: how do you know a group of related words with a subject and a verb is still not a sentence? It is not a sentence when it begins with a subordinating conjunction or a relative pronoun. For now, the focus is on the former; later on the latter.

PSAT prep 5

Subordinating conjunctions:

after, although, as, as if, because, before, even though, if, how, in order that, rather than, since, so that, than, that, though, unless, until, when, where, whether, while, why

These words subordinate, or make dependent, the group of related words with a subject and verb that comes after it.  For example, “Until she completes reading for at least forty minutes a day for her reading log, Fatima cannot go to sleep.”  The clause “Until she completes reading for at least forty minutes a day for her reading log” cannot stand alone because the thought is incomplete.  The thought is complete when the sentence is complete by adding “Fatima cannot go to sleep.”

Now, restate the above lesson in your own words and compose at least five sentences using the subordinating conjunctions above to show that you understand the lesson.

PSAT prep #4

As discussed already, many PSAT questions are based on understanding a sentence, a group of related words having a subject and verb that stands independently. Missing either the subject or the verb, or both, the group of words is not a sentence. Consider the following list of word groups and determine whether they are sentences. If they are a sentence, identify the subject and verb. If they are not a sentence, identify the missing part. Remember that a group of related words with a subject and a verb can also not be a sentence. When?

PSAT prep 4

Identify the following groups of words as a sentence (point out the subject and verb); or not a sentence (point out what is missing, or what is present, to make the group of words not a sentence):

  1. Begin!
  2. Runs around the track.
  3. Ali running around the track.
  4. Fatima loves to read.
  5. Reading is loved by Fatima.
  6. If only every student would work in class and be quiet.
  7. When it’s time to leave, I leave.
  8. Writing all the reading logs and completing the assignments posted on the blog.
  9. If only I could leave the house.
  10. Read!