Weekly Focus

This week (4-15-19) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.

Writing:

Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure.

Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

Math:

Distinguish between defining attributes (e.g., triangles are closed and three-sided) versus non-defining attributes (e.g., color, orientation, overall size); build and draw shapes to possess defining attributes.

Science:

Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.

Social Studies:

Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future using family or school events.

 

This week (4-8-19) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text.

Writing:

Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure.

Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

Ask questions to clear up any confusion about the topics and texts under discussion.

Math:

Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases:

Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.

Science:

Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.

Social Studies:  

Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future using family or school events.

Use a calendar to distinguish among days, weeks, and months.

 

This week (3-25-19) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Retell stories including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.

Writing:

Write explanatory texts in which students supply some facts about a topic and some sense of closure.

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Math:

Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases:

Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.

Science:

Use materials to design a solution to a human problem by mimicking how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs.

Social Studies:  

Give examples of places that have absolute locations (e.g., home address, school address).

Use personal directions (left, right, front, back) to describe the relative location of significant places in the school environment.

Distinguish between physical (e.g., clouds, trees, weather) and human (e.g., buildings, playgrounds, sidewalks) characteristics of places.

Construct simple maps of the classroom to demonstrate aerial perspective

Distinguish between landmasses and bodies of water using maps and globes.

 

This week (3-18-19) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

Writing:

Write explanatory texts in which students supply some facts about a topic and some sense of closure.

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Math:

Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.

Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11,  5 = __ – 3,
6 + 6 = __.

Science:

Plan and conduct investigations to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.

Social Studies:  

Give examples of places that have absolute locations (e.g., home address, school address).

Use personal directions (left, right, front, back) to describe the relative location of significant places in the school environment.

Distinguish between physical (e.g., clouds, trees, weather) and human (e.g., buildings, playgrounds, sidewalks) characteristics of places.

 

This week (3-11-19) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

Writing:

Write explanatory texts in which students supply some facts about a topic and some sense of closure.

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Math:

Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.

Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

Science:

Plan and conduct investigations to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.

Social Studies:  

Use personal directions (left, right, front, back) to describe the relative location of significant places in the school environment.

Distinguish between landmasses and bodies of water using maps and globes.

 

This week (3-4-19) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Identify who is telling the story at various points in a text.

Writing:

Write explanatory texts in which students supply some facts about a topic and some sense of closure.

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Math:

Compare two two-digit numbers based on meanings of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and <.

Subtract multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 from multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (positive or zero differences), using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used.

Science:

Plan and conduct investigations to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.

Social Studies:  

Give examples of places that have absolute locations (e.g., home address, school address).

 

This week (2-25-19) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information, drawing on a wide reading of a range of text types.

Writing:

Write information/explanatory texts in which students supply some facts about a topic and some sense of closure.

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Math:

Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral.

Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones.

Science:

Plan and conduct investigations to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.

Social Studies:  

Use personal directions (left, right, front, back) to describe the relative location of significant places in the school environment.

Distinguish between landmasses and bodies of water using maps and globes.

 

This week (2-18-19) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Describe the connection between two individuals, events, or pieces of information in a text.

Writing:

Write information/explanatory texts in which students supply some facts about a topic and some sense of closure.

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Math:

Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral.

Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases:

Science:

Plan and conduct investigations to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.

Social Studies:  

Use personal directions (left, right, front, back) to describe the relative location of significant places in the school environment.

Distinguish between landmasses and bodies of water using maps and globes.

 

This week (2-11-19) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text.

Writing:

Write information/explanatory texts in which students supply some facts about a topic and some sense of closure.

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Math:

Order three objects by length; compare the lengths of two objects indirectly by using a third object.

Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with no gaps or overlaps.

Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one category than in another.

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Science:

Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that objects in darkness can be seen only when illuminated.

 

Social Studies:  

Construct simple maps of the classroom to demonstrate aerial perspective.

Give examples of places that have absolute locations (e.g., home address, school address).

 

This week (2-4-19) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.

Writing:

Write information/explanatory texts in which students supply some facts about a topic and some sense of closure.

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Math:

Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one category than in another.

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Science:

Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that objects in darkness can be seen only when illuminated.

 

Social Studies:  

Construct simple maps of the classroom to demonstrate aerial perspective.

 

This week (1-28-19) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.

Writing:

Write information/explanatory texts in which students supply some facts about a topic and some sense of closure.

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Math:

Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one category than in another.

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Science:

Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that objects in darkness can be seen only when illuminated.

 

Social Studies:  

Construct simple maps of the classroom to demonstrate aerial perspective.

 

 

This week (1-22-19) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.

Writing:

Write information/explanatory texts in which students supply some facts about a topic and some sense of closure.

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Participate in shared research and writing projects

Math:

Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with no gaps or overlaps.

 

Science:

Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that objects in darkness can be seen only when illuminated.

 

Social Studies:  

Construct simple maps of the classroom to demonstrate aerial perspective

 

This week (1-14-19) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.

Writing:

Write information/explanatory texts in which students supply some facts about a topic and some sense of closure.

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Participate in shared research and writing projects

Math:

Order three objects by length; compare the lengths of two objects indirectly by using a third object.

Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with no gaps or overlaps.

Science:

Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate.
Focus Questions: How does sound travel from the source to the receiver?

 

Social Studies:  

Use fundamental principles and concepts of economics to understand economic activity in a market economy.

Describe economic wants they have experienced.

Distinguish between producers and consumers of goods and services.

Describe ways in which families consume goods and services.

Using examples, explain why people cannot have everything they want (scarcity) and describe how people respond (choice).

 

This week (1-7-19) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.

Writing:

Write information/explanatory texts in which students supply some facts about a topic and some sense of closure.

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Participate in shared research and writing projects

Math:

Order three objects by length; compare the lengths of two objects indirectly by using a third object.

Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with no gaps or overlaps.

Science:

Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate.

 

Social Studies:  

Distinguish between producers and consumers of goods and services.

Using examples, explain why people cannot have everything they want (scarcity) and describe how people respond (choice).

 

This week (12-17-18) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.

Writing:

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Math:

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8.

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 – 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2. 1.NBT.2.a Domain: Number & Operations in Base Ten 10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones — called a “ten.”

The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

Science:

Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate.

 

Social Studies:  

Describe ways in which families consume goods and services.

 

This week (12-10-18) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.

Writing:

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Math:

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8.

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 – 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2. 1.NBT.2.a Domain: Number & Operations in Base Ten 10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones — called a “ten.”

The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

Science:

Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate.

Social Studies:  

Distinguish between producers and consumers of goods and services.

Describe ways in which families consume goods and services.

 

This week (12-3-18) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

Writing:

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

Math:

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8.

Science:

Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate.

Social Studies:  

Describe economic wants they have experienced.

Use fundamental principles and concepts of economics to understand economic activity in a market economy.

 

This week (11-26-18) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text

Writing:

Write narratives in which students recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

Math:

Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8.

Science:

Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate.

Social Studies:  

Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future and family or school events.

Use components of culture (e.g., foods, language, religion, traditions) to describe diversity in family life.

Describe some responsibilities people have at home and at school (e.g., taking care of oneself, respect for the rights of others, following rules, getting along with others). Investigate a family history for at least two generations, identify various members and their connections

 

This week (11-19-18) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text.

Writing:

Write narratives in which students recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

Math:

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Science:

Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate.

Social Studies:  

Use components of culture (e.g., foods, language, religion, traditions) to describe diversity in family life.

Investigate a family history for at least two generations, identify various members and their connections

 

This week (11-12-18) we will be focusing on:

Reading:

Ask and answer questions about key details in the text.

Writing:

Write narratives in which students recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

Math:

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Science:

Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate.

Social Studies:  

Use components of culture (e.g., foods, language, religion, traditions) to describe diversity in family life.

Investigate a family history for at least two generations, identify various members and their connections

 

This week (11-5-18) we will be focusing on:

Reading:
Students use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.

Writing:

Write narratives in which students recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

Math:

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Science:

Make observations at different times of year to relate the amount of daylight to the time of year.

Social Studies:  

Use components of culture (e.g., foods, language, religion, traditions) to describe diversity in family life.

 

This week (10-29-18) we will be focusing on:

Reading:
Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text.

Writing:

Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure.

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Math:

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Relate counting to addition and subtraction

Science:

Plan and conduct simple investigations.

Identify the tools that might be used to measure temperature, precipitation, cloud cover, and wind.

Observe and collect data of weather conditions over a period of time.

Social Studies:  

Describe some responsibilities people have at home and at school (e.g., taking care of oneself, respect for the rights of others, following rules, getting along with others).

 

This week (10-22-18) we will be focusing on:

Reading:
Identify main topic and retell key details.

Writing:

Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure.

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Math:

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Relate counting to addition and subtraction

Science:

How and why is Earth constantly changing?

Social Studies:  

Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future and family or school events.

Use components of culture (e.g., foods, language, religion, traditions) to describe diversity in family life.

 

This week (10-15-18) we will be focusing on:

Reading:
Ask and answer questions about key details in the text.

Writing:

Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure.

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Math:

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Relate counting to addition and subtraction

Science:

Make observations at different times of year to relate the amount of daylight to the time of year.

Social Studies:  

Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future and family or school events.

 

This week (10-8-18) we will be focusing on:

Reading:
Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

Writing:  Write narratives in which students recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

Math:

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 – 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2.

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Relate counting to addition and subtraction

Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = __ – 3, 6 + 6 = __.

Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

Science:

Ask questions, gather info about situation people want to change to define problem solved through development of object.

Develop simple sketch, drawing, physical model to illustrate how the shape of an object helps it function to solve a problem.

Social Studies:  

Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future and family or school events.

 

This week (10-1-18) we will be focusing on:

Reading:
Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

Writing:  Write narratives in which students recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

Math:

Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Science:

Ask questions, gather info about situation people want to change to define problem solved through development of object.

Develop simple sketch, drawing, physical model to illustrate how the shape of an object helps it function to solve a problem.

Social Studies:  

Identify important symbols of the United States of America (e.g., Statue of Liberty, Uncle Sam, White House, Bald Eagle).

 

This week (9-24-18) we will be focusing on:

Reading:  Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.

Writing:  Write narratives in which students recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

Math:  Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = __ – 3, 6 + 6 = __

Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).

Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 – 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2

Science:  Plan and conduct simple investigations.

Manipulate simple tools (for example: hand lens, pencils, rulers, thermometers, rain gauges, balances, non-standard objects for measurement) that aid observation and data collection.

Social Studies:  Identify situations in which people act as good citizens in the school community (e.g., thoughtful and effective participation in the school decisions, respect for the rights of others, respect for rule of law, voting, volunteering, compassion, courage, honesty).

Describe some responsibilities people have at home and at school (e.g., taking care of oneself, respect for the rights of others, following rules, getting along with others).

 

This week (9-17-18) we will be focusing on:

Reading:  Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.

Writing:  Write narratives in which students recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

Math:  Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10.

Science:   Make observations (firsthand or from media) to collect data that can be used to make comparisons.

Plan and conduct simple investigations.

Manipulate simple tools for measurement that aid observation and data collection.

Social Studies:

Discuss why Americans are celebrating Constitution Day on September 17th.

Identify situations in which people act as good citizens in the school community (e.g., thoughtful and effective participation in the school decisions, respect for the rights of others, respect for rule of law, voting, volunteering, compassion, courage, honesty).

Give examples of the use of power with authority in school (e.g., principal, teacher or bus driver enforcing school rules).

 

This week (9-10-18) we will be focusing on:

Reading:  Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

Writing:  Write narratives in which students recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

Math:  Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Science:   Make observations (firsthand or from media) to collect data that can be used to make comparisons.

Social Studies:  Explain how decision can be made or how conflicts might be resolved in fair and just ways (e.g., majority rules).

 

This week (9-3-18) we will be focusing on:

Reading:  Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

Writing:  Write narratives in which students recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

Math:  Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).

Science:  Make observations at different times of year to relate the amount of daylight to the time of year.

Ask questions, make observations, and gather information about a situation people want to change to define a simple problem that can be solved through the development of a new or improved object or tool.

 

Social Studies: Identify some reasons for rules in school (e.g., provide order, predictability, and safety).

 

This week (8-27-18) we will be focusing on:

Making friends, learning routines and getting back into the swing of going to school. 🙂