Weekly Focus



1-20-20

Reading:

Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.

Writing:

Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.

Math:

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8.

Science:

Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate.

Social Studies:

Construct simple maps of the classroom to demonstrate aerial perspective.



1-13-20

Reading:

Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.

Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.

Writing:

Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.

Math:

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Science:

Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate.

Social Studies:

Describe ways in which families consume goods and services.

Using examples, explain why people cannot have everything they want (scarcity) and describe how people respond (choice)

1-6-20

Reading:

Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.

Writing:

Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.

Math:

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Science:

Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate.

Social Studies:

Distinguish between producers and consumers of goods and services. 1

Using examples, explain why people cannot have everything they want (scarcity) and describe how people respond (choice)

12-16-19

Reading:

Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.

Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.

Writing:

Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Math:

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Science:

Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate.

Social Studies:

Distinguish between producers and consumers of goods and services.

12-9-19

Reading:

Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

Writing:

Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Math:

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Science:

Plan and conduct investigations to provide evidence that vibrating materials can make sound and that sound can make materials vibrate.

Social Studies:

Distinguish between producers and consumers of goods and services.

Describe ways in which families consume goods and services.

12-2-19

Reading:

Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.

Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories.

Writing:

Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Math:

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Science:

Students answer the question: What causes sound?

Social Studies:

Use fundamental principles and concepts of economics to understand economic activity in a market economy.

Describe economic wants they have experienced.


11-25-19

Reading:

Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories

Writing:

Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Math:

Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8.

Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10.

Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = __ – 3, 6 + 6 = __.

Science:

I can investigate what causes sound.

Social Studies:

Use components of culture (e.g., foods, language, religion, traditions) to describe diversity in family life.

Describe some responsibilities people have at home and at school (e.g., taking care of oneself, respect for the rights of others, following rules, getting along with others).

Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future and family or school events.


11-18-19

Reading:

Retell stories including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.

Writing:

Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Math:

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Science:

Analyze and interpret data.

Social Studies:

Use components of culture (e.g., foods, language, religion, traditions) to describe diversity in family life.

11-11-19

Reading:

Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text.

Students use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.

Writing:

Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion.

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Math:

Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8. 1.O

Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = __ – 3, 6 + 6 = __.

Science:

Plan and conduct simple investigations.

Make observations at different times of year to relate the amount of daylight to the time of year.

Social Studies:

Describe some responsibilities people have at home and at school (e.g., taking care of oneself, respect for the rights of others, following rules, getting along with others).

11-4-19

Reading:

Ask and answer questions about key details in the text

Writing:

Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion.

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Math:

Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8. 1.O

Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = __ – 3, 6 + 6 = __.

Science:

Plan and conduct simple investigations.

Make observations at different times of year to relate the amount of daylight to the time of year.

Social Studies:

Describe some responsibilities people have at home and at school (e.g., taking care of oneself, respect for the rights of others, following rules, getting along with others).

10-28-19

Reading:

Students use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.

Distinguish between information provided by pictures or other illustrations and information provided by the words in a text.

Writing:

Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion.

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Math:

Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8. 1.OA.5 Domain: Operations & Algebraic Thinking Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = __ – 3, 6 + 6 = __.

Science:

Plan and conduct simple investigations.

Identify the tools that might be used to measure temperature, precipitation, cloud cover, and wind.

Observe and collect data of weather conditions over a period of time.

Social Studies:

Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future and family or school events.

Use components of culture (e.g., foods, language, religion, traditions) to describe diversity in

10-21-19

Reading:

Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text.

Writing:

Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion.

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Math:

Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For example, subtract 10 – 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8. 1.OA.5 Domain: Operations & Algebraic Thinking Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = __ – 3, 6 + 6 = __.

Science:

How and why is Earth constantly changing?

Social Studies:

Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future and family or school events.

10-14-19

Reading:

Identify main topic and retell key details.

Writing:

Write narratives in which students recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, and provide some sense of closure.

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing

Math:

Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Science:

Make observations at different times of year to relate the amount of daylight to the time of year.

Social Studies:

Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future and family or school events.


10-7-19

Reading:

Ask and Answer questions about key details in a text.

Writing:

Write narratives in which students recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, and provide some sense of closure.

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Math:

Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

Science:

Plan and conduct simple investigations.

Manipulate simple tools for measurement that aid observation and data collection.”

Social Studies:

Identify important symbols of the United States of America (e.g., Statue of Liberty, Uncle Sam, White House, Bald Eagle).

9-30-19

Reading:

Ask and Answer questions about key details in a text.

Writing:

Write narratives in which students recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, and provide some sense of closure.

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Math:

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Science:

Plan and conduct simple investigations.

Manipulate simple tools for measurement that aid observation and data collection.”

Social Studies:

Identify situations in which people act as good citizens in the school community (e.g., thoughtful and effective participation in the school decisions, respect for the rights of others, respect for rule of law, voting, volunteering, compassion, courage, honesty).

Describe some responsibilities people have at home and at school (e.g., taking care of oneself, respect for the rights of others, following rules, getting along with others).

9-23-19

Reading:

Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.

Writing:

Write narratives in which students recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, and provide some sense of closure.

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Math:

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).

Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 – 4 = 13 – 3 – 1 = 10 – 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 – 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).

Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = __ – 3, 6 + 6 =

Science:

Plan and conduct simple investigations.

Manipulate simple tools for measurement that aid observation and data collection.”

Social Studies:

Identify situations in which people act as good citizens in the school community (e.g., thoughtful and effective participation in the school decisions, respect for the rights of others, respect for rule of law, voting, volunteering, compassion, courage, honesty).

Give examples of the use of power with authority in school (e.g., principal, teacher or bus driver enforcing school rules).


9-16-19

Reading:

Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

Writing:

Write narratives in which students recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.

Math:

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).

Science:

Plan and conduct simple investigations.

Manipulate simple tools (for example: hand lens, pencils, rulers, thermometers, rain gauges, balances, non-standard objects for measurement) that aid observation and data collection.

Social Studies:

Constitution Day

Explain how decision can be made or how conflicts might be resolved in fair and just ways (majority rules)

9-9-19

Reading:

Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.

Writing:

Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.

Math:

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Relate counting to addition and subtraction (e.g., by counting on 2 to add 2).

Science: Air and Weather

Plan and conduct simple investigations.

Manipulate simple tools for measurement that aid observation and data collection.

Social Studies:

Explain how decision can be made or how conflicts might be resolved in fair and just ways.

9-3-19

We will continue practicing routines and procedures this week. Homework will be given every day except on Friday. We will also be taking the NWEA and iReady diagnostic assessments.

8-26-19

We will be working on learning classroom and school expectations this week. Our class will also be practicing routines and procedures to help us have a successful year in first grade.