Archive for November 2017

U.S. History

Thursday-11/29/17:

  • Bell Work-1.) Based on your prior knowledge can you name the event depicted in this political cartoon? 2.) What can we infer might most likely be the criminal’s motives in referring to the police officer as “Our Ally”? 3.) When the Boston police officers began striking in 1919 many people were upset that the police were not doing their job to protect citizens from crime. In your opinion were the police justified in prioritizing their own personal interests over their responsibility to protect the citizens of Boston? 
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Activity-The Era of Prohibition-DBQ-2017
  • Daily Objective-
  • Content Objective:
    • SWD evaluation of the effect of prohibition on the United States and how the failures of the Prohibition Bureau and the Volstead Act led to its eventual repeal  by interpreting the meaning of several primary source documents in a collaborative activity
  • Language Objective:
    • Students will read, discuss and record information pertaining to the effect of prohibition on the United States and how the failures of the Prohibition Bureau and the Volstead Act led to its eventual repeal by identifying key pieces of information contained in a DBQ packet with the help of a partner

 

Supplemental Materials: Activity-The Era of Prohibition-DBQ-2017

The Era of Prohibition-DBQ-2017

 

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Government

Thursday-11/30/17:

  • Bell Work-1.) Describe what is happening in the political cartoon? 2.) Based on the content of the political cartoon what is the artist to say is the role of lobbyists within our political system? (Try to stay away from just saying they’re bribing congress, think deeper) 3.) Suppose you could create new legislation that would force lobbyists to disclose every dollar they “donated” to the public. At what dollar amount, would you make them start disclosing their donations and do you think that this will help or hinder Congress’ ability to pass new laws?
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Activity-Special Interest Groups-Brochure Activity (Day 3)
  • Daily Objective-
  • Content Objective:
    • SWD synthesis of the ways in which interest groups work to recruit new members through grass roots tactics by creating a take away element an interest group can use to recruit new members
  • Language Objective:
    • Students will read, research and record the ways in which interest groups work to requite new members through grass roots tactics by creating brochure designed to encourage citizens to join their interest group

 

Supplemental Materials: Activity-Special Interest Groups-Brochure Activity (Day 3)

Special Interest Groups-Brochure Activity

Brochure Template-Blank-2016

ASPCA-Brochure Example

Interest Group Brochure-Rubric

 

U.S. History

Thursday-11/30/17:

  • Bell Work-) Who is speaking in this primary source excerpt? 2.) Based on the primary source can you distinguish why the speaker feels that jazz is “an inherent expression of Negro life”? 3.) Judge the value of the statement “But, to my mind, it is the duty of the younger Negro artist … to change thought he force of his art that old whispering ‘I want to be white’, hidden in the aspirations of his people, to ‘Why should I want to be white? I am Negro-and beautiful”. Why is a view like this a positive approach to the challenges of racial discrimination?
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Vocab Match-Up-Chapter 12-Politics of the Roaring Twenties and Chapter 13-The Roaring Life of the 1920’s (5 min)
  • Thinking Map-Pop Culture in the 1920’s-Bubble Map
  • Presentation-Chapter 13-Section 3-Education and Popular Culture
  • Video Clip-Steamboat Willie (7:22 min)
  • Notes-Chapter 13-Section 3-Education and Popular Culture
  • Daily Objective-
    • Content Objectives:
      • SWD analysis of key terms associated with the unit covering the Roaring Twenties by manipulating of vocabulary terms in a collaborative activity
      • SWD synthesis the how the how new educational opportunities and the emergence of pop culture impacted Americans during the 1920’s by creating a set of guided notes
    • Language Objective:
      • Students will read and orally match up important vocabulary terms pertaining to the unit covering the Roaring Twenties through the use of a vocabulary match-up activity
      • Student will read and record information pertaining to how new educational opportunities and the emergence of pop culture impacted Americans during the 1920’s through listening to a short lecture and a student led outline

 

Supplemental Materials: Thinking Map-Pop Culture in the 1920’s-Bubble Map, Presentation-Chapter 13-Section 3-Education and Popular Culture and Notes-Chapter 13-Section 3-Education and Popular Culture

Thinking Map-Pop Culture in the 1920’s-Bubble Map

Pop Culture in the 1920s-Bubble Map-US History

 

Presentation-Chapter 13-Section 3-Education and Popular Culture

Chapter 13-Section 3- Education and Popular Culture Chapter 13-Section 3- Education and Popular Culture

 

Notes-Chapter 13-Section 3-Education and Popular Culture

Notes-Outline-Chapter 13-Section 3

The Americans-Chapter 13-Section 3

 

Video Link- Walt Disney Animation Studios’ Steamboat Willie (7:22 min)

 

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Government

Wednesday-11/29/17:

  • Bell Work-1.) How would you explain in your own words is the biggest advantage to the political involvement of interest groups? 2.) What is the major problem with the fact that interest groups seem to have a “one track mind” when it comes to prominent issues? 3.) Based on the chart above do you feel that interest groups are a positive addition to the political process or one of the major problems that contribute to political corruption? *Thoroughly explain your reasoning 
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Video Clip-Thank You for Smoking (3/5) Movie CLIP-Ice Cream Politics (2005) HD (2:29 min)
  • Activity-Special Interest Groups-Brochure Activity (Day 2)
  • Daily Objective-
  • Content Objective:
    • SWD synthesis of the ways in which interest groups work to recruit new members through grass roots tactics by creating a take away element an interest group can use to recruit new members
  • Language Objective:
    • Students will read, research and record the ways in which interest groups work to requite new members through grass roots tactics by creating brochure designed to encourage citizens to join their interest group

 

 

Supplemental Materials: Activity-Special Interest Groups-Brochure Activity (Day 1)

Special Interest Groups-Brochure Activity

Brochure Template-Blank-2016

ASPCA-Brochure Example

 

Video Clip-Thank You for Smoking (3/5) Movie CLIP-Ice Cream Politics (2005) HD (2:29 min)

 

U.S. History

Tuesdayday-11/28/17:

  • Bell Work-1.) Is the following statement true or false? The main reason many workers in labor intensive industries began to strike around 1919 was due to low wages, long hours and virtually no support against business owners from the Federal Government. *Explain why you made your decision. 2.) What is the underlying theme of the political cartoon? 3.) What might be a possible solution to this impasse (a situation in which no progress is possible, especially because of disagreement; a deadlock) between laborers and business owners?
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Video-America The Story of U.S.-Episode 9-Bust (45 min)
  • w/ video questions
  • Daily Objective-
  • Content Objective:
    • SWD knowledge of the social changes going on in the late 1920’s and early 1930’s where a period of financial boom turns into economic bust when the stock market crashes, the dust bowl blanket the nation in darkness and Roosevelt’s New Deal signals recovery from the Great Depression by watching a film and recording structured video facts.
  • Language Objective:
    • Students will watch, listen and record information pertaining to the social changes going on in the late 1920’s and early 1930’s where a period of financial boom turns into economic bust when the stock market crashes, the dust bowl blanket the nation in darkness and Roosevelt’s New Deal signals recovery from the Great Depression through watching a short film and recording twenty-five video facts

 

Video Link-America The Story of U.S.-Episode 9-Bust (45 min)

  • w/ video questions

America the Story of US-Episode 9-Bust-Video Questions

 

 

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Government

Tuesday-11/28/17:

  • Bell Work-1.) Based on the information from our unit covering the election process please provide a definition for the term “Super PAC” in your own words. 2.) What is the underlying theme of the political cartoon? 3.) If you were given the power to construct a model for campaign finance reform that would take power away from the anonymous donors running these Super PACS and create a system where political donations were fairly regulated what would be the primary focus of your reform initiative?  
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Video-When Does Lobbying Become Bribery? (2:57 min)
    • EQ: When does the process of legal political lobbying cross over into bribery?
  • Activity-Special Interest Groups-Brochure Activity (Day 1)
  • Daily Objective-
  • Content Objective:
    • SWD synthesis of the ways in which interest groups work to recruit new members through grass roots tactics by creating a take away element an interest group can use to recruit new members
  • Language Objective:
    • Students will read, research and record the ways in which interest groups work to requite new members through grass roots tactics by creating brochure designed to encourage citizens to join their interest group

 

Supplemental Materials: Activity-Special Interest Groups-Brochure Activity (Day 1)

Special Interest Groups-Brochure Activity

Brochure Template-Blank-2016

ASPCA-Brochure Example

 

Video Link-When Does Lobbying Become Bribery? (2:57 min)

  • EQ: When does the process of legal political lobbying cross over into bribery?

 

 

 

U.S. History

Monday-11/27/17:

  • Bell Work-1.) Based on your prior knowledge can you name the event depicted in this political cartoon? 2.) What can we infer might most likely be the criminal’s motives in referring to the police officer as “Our Ally”? 3.) When the Boston police officers began striking in 1919 many people were upset that the police were not doing their job to protect citizens from crime. In your opinion were the police justified in prioritizing their own personal interests over their responsibility to protect the citizens of Boston?  
  • Vocab Match-Up-Chapter 12-Politics of the Roaring Twenties and Chapter 13-The Roaring Life of the 1920’s (5 min)
  • Presentation-Chapter 13-Section 2-The Twenties Woman
  • Outline Notes-Chapter 13-Section 2-The Twenties Woman
  • Daily Objective-
    • Content Objective: 
      • SWD analysis of key terms associated with the unit covering the Roaring Twenties by manipulating of vocabulary terms in a collaborative activity
      • SWD synthesis the changing roles of women in the 1920’s by interacting in a short presentation and creating a set of student centered guided notes
      • Language Objective:
        • Students will read and orally match up important vocabulary terms pertaining to the unit covering the Roaring Twenties through the use of a vocabulary match-up activity
        • Student will read and record information pertaining to the changing roles of women in the 1920’s through listening to a short lecture and creating student centered guided notes

 

Supplemental Materials: Vocab Match-Up-Chapter 12-Politics of the Roaring Twenties and Chapter 13-The Roaring Life of the 1920’s, Presentation-Chapter 13-Section 2-The Twenties Woman and Outline Notes-Chapter 13-Section 2-The Twenties Woman

Vocab Match-Up-Chapter 12-Politics of the Roaring Twenties and Chapter 13-The Roaring Life of the 1920’s

Chapter 12 and 13-Vocab Match up Terms

Presentation-Chapter 13-Section 2-The Twenties Woman

Chapter 13-Section 2-The Twenties Woman

 

Outline Notes-Chapter 13-Section 2-The Twenties Woman

Notes-Outline-Chapter 13-Section 2

The Americans-Chapter 13-Section 2

 

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Government

Monday-11/27/17:

  • Bell Work-1.) What is the meaning of the buttons the gentlemen are wearing that reads “1%”? 2.) What point is the political cartoon attempting to convey about the issues with campaign contributions? 3.) What do you think was the artist intended purpose when he chose to draw the man representing the Supreme Court sitting by the edge of the stage watching the wealthy gentlemen throw money at the politician?  
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Video-What Is Lobbying and Can It Be Good? (3:00 min)
  • Presentation-Interest Groups (2016)
  • Vocabulary-Chapter 9-Interest Groups
  • Frayer Model Activity
  • Daily Objective-
  • Content Objective:
    • SWD comprehension of the roles of lobbyists and the goals of political interest groups by interpreting information presented by the teacher and participating in a classroom discussion
    • SWD analysis of key terms associated with the unit covering the roles of interest groups in politics by defining and personalizing vocabulary terms in a vocabulary based activity
  • Language Objective:
    • Students will listen and orally discuss the roles of lobbyists and the goals of political interest groups by watching two short videos and participating in classroom discussions following a short lecture by the teacher
    • Students will read and record important vocabulary terms pertaining to our unit covering the roles of interest groups in politics through the use of a frayer model vocabulary activity

 

Supplemental Materials: Presentation-Interest Groups (2016) and Vocabulary-Chapter 9-Interest Groups

Presentation-Interest Groups (2016)

Interest Groups-2016

 

Vocabulary-Chapter 9-Interest Groups

Chapter 9-Vocabulary Terms

Frayer Vocabulary Model

 

Notes Checklist Chapter 6 and 7-Being Collected on Tuesday 11/28

Chapter 6 and 7-Notes Check List

Chapter 6-Scection 1-Guided Notes

Chapter 6-Scection 3-Guided Notes

Chapter 6-Scection 4-Guided Notes

Chapter 7-Section 1 and 2-Guided Notes

Chapter 7-Section 3-Guided Notes

 

Video Link-What Is Lobbying and Can It Be Good? (3:00 min)

 

U.S. History

Tuesday-11/21/17:

  • Bell Work-) Who is the author and who is the group of people the poem is focused on? 2.) After reading the primary source what questions might you ask of the author regarding his decision to write this particular poem? 3.) What changes would you recommend to the author in order to help more people emotionally connect with the poem?
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Vocab Match-Up-Chapter 12-Politics of the Roaring Twenties and Chapter 13-The Roaring Life of the 1920’s (5 min)
  • Video- Boardwalk Empire: Speakeasy Tour (HBO) (24:39 min)
    • Reflection Question: How did speakeasies help preserve many Americans desire to drink following the passage of the 18th Amendment?
  • Daily Objective-
    • Content Objective:
      • SWD analysis of key terms associated with the unit covering the Roaring Twenties by manipulating of vocabulary terms in a collaborative activity
      • SWD synthesis the how the major changes in the lives of rural and urban Americans combined with the policy of prohibition led to radical social changes by interacting in a short video and a guided reflection question
    • Language Objective:
      • Students will read and orally match up important vocabulary terms pertaining to the unit covering the Roaring Twenties through the use of a vocabulary match-up activity
      • Student will read and record information pertaining to the how the major changes in the lives of rural and urban Americans combined with the policy of prohibition led to radical social changes through watching a short video and responding to an inquiry based question

 

Video Link- Boardwalk Empire: Speakeasy Tour (HBO) (24:39 min)

  • Reflection Question: How did speakeasies help preserve many Americans desire to drink following the passage of the 18th Amendment?

 

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Government

Tuesday-10/21/17:

  • Bell Work-Please take out your notes/study guide and with your elbow partner review all of the information for our quiz covering Chapter 6 and 7.
  • You will be given about ten minutes to study prior to the test.
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Quiz-Chapter 6-Voters and Voter Behavior and Chapter 7-The Election Process
  • Daily Objective-
  • Content Objective:
    • SWD evaluation of key terms and concepts associated with our unit covering the role of voters and how the election process in America is organized by demonstrating their knowledge thought the use of a unit quiz
  • Language Objective:
    • Students will read and write their answers in order to match up important vocabulary terms and information pertaining to our unit covering role of voters and how the election process in America is organized by completing a multiple choice and matching quiz

 

 

U.S. History

Monday-11/20/17:

  • Bell Work-1.) What law is President Harding referring to in the primary source document? 2.) What are some of the problems that could arise if local community leaders choose not to follow laws passed by the government? 3.) What do you think about the statement being made by President Harding? Is it the job of community leaders to enforce the laws or should the federal government be solely responsible for enforcing the laws they pass?
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Video- Roots of Prohibition The Time is Now (13:20 min)
  • Presentation-Chapter 13-Section 1-Changing Ways of Life
  • Guided Notes-Chapter 13-Section 1-Changing Ways of Life
  • Daily Objective-
  • Content Objective:
    • SWD synthesis the how the major changes in the lives of rural and urban Americans combined with the policy of prohibition led to radical social changes by interacting in a short presentation and completing a set of student led notes
  • Language Objective:
    • Student will read and record information pertaining to the how the major changes in the lives of rural and urban Americans combined with the policy of prohibition led to radical social changes through listening to a short lecture and completing a set of student led notes

 

Supplemental Materials: Presentation-Chapter 13-Section 1-Changing Ways of Life and Guided Notes-Chapter 13-Section 1-Changing Ways of Life

Guided Notes-Chapter 13-Section 1-Changing Ways of Life

Notes-Outline-Chapter 13-Section 1

The Americans-Chapter 13-Section 1

 

Video- Roots of Prohibition The Time is Now (13:20 min)

 

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Government

Monday-10/20/17:

  • Bell Work-1.) Based on the information contained in the primary source when was the 26th Amendment to the Constitution ratified?  2.) Imagine you were a reporter working for the Detroit Free Press and you were granted an interview with President Nixon. What are two or three questions that you would you ask the President regarding the ratification of the 26th Amendment? 3.) What is your opinion regarding the passage of the 26th Amendment? *Discuss whether you feel the voting age should have remained at twenty-one like in the late 1960’s or if you think the decision to lower the voting age to eighteen was the right decision.
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Study Guide Review Time-Chapter 6-Voters and Voter Behavior and Chapter 7-The Election Process
  • Daily Objective-
  • Content Objective:
    • SWD analysis of the requirements and responsibilities associated with voter qualification by examining a voter registration form and completing student led notes on voter qualifications.
    • SWD evaluation of the materials covering the role of voters and how the election process in America is organized by demonstrating their knowledge through summarizing key information in a structured study guide
  • Language Objective:
    • Students will read and record the requirements and responsibilities associated with voter qualification through the use of a voter registration activity and student driven guided notes.
    • Students will read, and write the key terms and important concepts covering the role of voters and how the election process in America is organized by demonstrating their knowledge by completing a structured inquiry based study guide

 

  • Study Guide Review Time-Chapter 6-Voters and Voter Behavior and Chapter 7-The Election Process

Chapter 6 and 7-Learning Target-Study Guide

Chapter 6-Vocabulary

Chapter 7-Vocabulary

Chapter 6-Section 1-The Right to Vote

Chapter 6-Section 2-Voter Qualifications-Power Point

Chapter 6-Section 3-Suffrage and Civil Rights

Chapter 6-Section 4-Voter Behavior

Chapter 7-The Electoral Process-2016

Chapter 6 and 7-Test Materials

 

U.S. History

Friday-11/17/17:

  • Bell Work- 1.) What can we infer is the main subject this political cartoon is trying to depict? 2.) What were some of the major problems that arose during this scandal? (Look in your U.S. history textbook on page 421 if you are not familiar with the scandal) 3.) What changes would you recommend to the political cartoon make it more accessible to an audience that might not be familiar with the scandal?
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Vocab Match-Up-Chapter 12-Politics of the Roaring Twenties and Chapter 13-The Roaring Life of the 1920’s (5 min)
  • Video-Prohibition in the United States: National Ban of Alcohol (4:56 min)
  • Activity-Creating Prohibition Political Cartoons/Comic Panels
  • Daily Objective-
  • SWD analysis of key terms associated with the unit covering the Roaring Twenties by manipulating of vocabulary terms in a collaborative activity
  • SWD synthesis of the meanings and symbolisms associated with political cartoons during the era of prohibition by creating a political cartoons or a coherent story within comic panels that supports the concept of prohibition during the 1920’s
  • Language Objective:
    • Students will read and orally match up important vocabulary terms pertaining to the unit covering the Roaring Twenties through the use of a vocabulary match-up activity
    • Student will draw and orally discuss the meanings and symbolism associated with political cartoons during the era of prohibition by creating a political cartoons or a coherent story within comic panels focused on Americas support for prohibition

 

Supplemental Materials: Vocab Match-Up-Chapter 12-Politics of the Roaring Twenties and Chapter 13-The Roaring Life of the 1920’s and Activity-Creating Prohibition Political Cartoons/Comic Panels

Vocab Match-Up-Chapter 12-Politics of the Roaring Twenties and Chapter 13-The Roaring Life of the 1920’s

Chapter 12 and 13-Vocab Match up Terms

 

Activity-Creating Prohibition Political Cartoons/Comic Panels

Prohibition Political Cartoon-Comic-Assignment-2017

 

Video Link-Prohibition in the United States: National Ban of Alcohol (4:56 min)

 

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Government

Friday-11/17/17:

  • Bell Work-1 1.) What is the underlying theme behind this excerpt from Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s speech? 2.) Can you distinguish the difference between the focus of this document and the others in terms of the date it was written and the message it is trying to convey? 3.) What can you predict based on the pervious documents and your prior knowledge might be the reaction of male voters after hearing this speech?
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Video Clip-What Are Super PACs? (3:29 min)
  • Presentation-Chapter 7-Section 2-The Elections and Chapter 7-Section 3-Money and Elections
  • Notes-Chapter 7-Section 3-Money and Elections
  • Study Guide-Chapter 6-Voters and Voter Behavior and Chapter 7-The Election Process
  • Daily Objective-
  • Content Objective:
    • SWD analysis of the various ways in which voters can cast their ballots and the role local precincts/polling places play in the election process by interacting in a short presentation and creating a set of student centered guided notes
    • SWD analysis of the various sources of campaign funding and the issues raised by campaign spending by outlining important information in guided notes
    • SWD evaluation of the materials covering the role of voters and how the election process in America is organized through summarizing key information in a structured study guide
  • Language Objective:
    • Students will read and record information pertaining to the various ways in which voters can cast their ballots and the role local precincts/polling places play in the election process through listening to a short lecture and creating student centered guided notes
    • Students will read and record information pertaining to the various sources of campaign funding and the issues raised by campaign spending through reading through text and completing a set of student led guided notes.
    • Students will read, and write the key terms and important concepts covering the role of voters and how the election process in America is organized by completing a structured inquiry based study guide

 

Supplemental Materials: Presentation-Chapter 7-Section 2-The Elections and Chapter 7-Section 3-Money and Elections, Notes-Chapter 7-Section 3-Money and Elections and Study Guide-Chapter 6-Voters and Voter Behavior and Chapter 7-The Election Process

 

Presentation-Chapter 7-Section 2-The Elections and Chapter 7-Section 3-Money and Elections

Chapter 7-The Electoral Process-2017

 

Notes-Chapter 7-Section 3-Money and Elections

Chapter 7-Section 2-Guided Notes-High

Chapter 7-Section 3-Guided Notes

 

Study Guide-Chapter 6-Voters and Voter Behavior and Chapter 7-The Election Process  

Chapter 6 and 7-Learning Target-Study Guide

 

 

Video Clip-What Are Super PACs? (3:29 min)

U.S. History

Thursday-11/16/17:

  • Bell Work-1.) Based on the context of the political cartoon what can we infer the term “frugal” means when referring to our forefathers? 2.) What is the underlying theme of the political cartoon?3.) How might the materialistic nature of the man representing “This generation” have contributed to the economic downturn that in 1929 resulted in the Great Depression?  
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Activity-Prohibition Political Cartoons Activity (Part 1)
  • Daily Objective-
  • Content Objective:
    • SWD evaluation of the meanings and symbolisms associated with political cartoons during the era of prohibition by interpreting and breaking down the elements in several political cartoons from the 1920’s
  • Language Objective:
    • Student will read, write and orally discuss the meanings and symbolisms associated with political cartoons during the era of prohibition by discussing how the artists purpose helps supports the elements in several political cartoons from the 1920’s focused on prohibition

 

1st Hours Homework-This is due tomorrow in class (11/17)

Chapter 12 Assessment-2017

Chapter 12-Textbook-PDFs

 

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Government

Thursday-11/16/17:

  • Bell Work-1.) Can you explain based to the primary source excerpt how the author believed Blacks [African Americans] would attempt to justify their right to gain full suffrage? 2.) Based on historical context and your prior knowledge can you identify another historical instance in which African Americans had to fight against unfair obstacles simply to enjoy the right to vote? 3.) What do you believe might have happened if the United States had granted Blacks [African American’s] the right to vote following the arguments made by the Liberty Party in 1840? Do you think as a result of suffrage being extended to African Americans at this time that the Civil War could have been avoided or was this just a fight we were destined to have?
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Video-Honest Political Ads-Gil Fulbright for President (2:17 min)
  • SSR Article-Money and Politics in The Age Of Trump (November 2016)
  • With Meta-Log
  • Notes-Chapter 7-Section 2-The Elections
  • Daily Objective-
    • Content Objective:
      • SWD evaluation of the potential shift in how campaign financing is handled during the election process in the wake of Donald Trump’s winning the presidential election by evaluating a primary source and responding to inquiry based log
      • SWD analysis of the various ways in which voters can cast their ballots and the role local precincts/polling places play in the election process by interacting in a short presentation and creating a set of student centered guided notes
    • Language Objective:
      • Students will read and respond to an article pertaining to the potential shift in how campaign financing is handled during the election process in the wake of Donald Trump’s winning the presidential election by examining a primary source and responding to and meta-cognitive log
      • Students will read and record information pertaining to the various ways in which voters can cast their ballots and the role local precincts/polling places play in the election process through listening to a short lecture and creating student centered guided notes

 

Supplemental Materials: SSR Article-Money and Politics in The Age Of Trump (November 2016)-With Meta-Log and Notes-Chapter 7-Section 2-The Elections

 

SSR Article-Money and Politics in The Age Of Trump (November 2016)-With Meta-Log 

Money and Politics in The Age Of Trump-SSR Article

SSR-Meta-Cognitive Log-Template

 

Notes-Chapter 7-Section 2-The Elections

Chapter 7-Section 2-Guided Notes-High

 

Video Link-Honest Political Ads-Gil Fulbright for President (2:17 min)

U.S. History

Wednesday-11/15/17: Late Start

  • Bell Work- 1.) Write in your own words based on the background information included above the text box how the Klan’s original goals of oppression against one race evolved overtime to oppress a multitude of ethnic groups? 2.) What are some of the motives behind the Klan’s anger towards the changes going on in America during the 1920’s? 3.) Examine the following line “… and finally even our right to teach our own children in our own school’s fundamental facts and truths have been torn away from us”. Do you think that even though the members of the Klan were teaching morally reprehensible ideas should they still have the right to educate their children in the ways they believe are best? *Please explain your thoughts
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Vocabulary Frayer Model Activity-Chapter 13-The Roaring Life of the 1920’s
  • Daily Objective-
  • Content Objective:
    • SWD analysis of key terms associated with the unit covering Chapter 13 by defining and personalizing vocabulary terms in a vocabulary based activity
  • Language Objective:
    • Students will read and record important vocabulary terms pertaining to our unit covering Chapter 13 through the use of a frayer model vocabulary activity

 

Supplemental Materials: Vocabulary Frayer Model Activity-Chapter 13-The Roaring Life of the 1920’s

Chapter 13-Vocabulary List

Frayer Vocabulary Model

 

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Government

Wednesday-11/15/17:

  • Bell Work-1.) Can you name the nursery rhyme that this political cartoon is referencing? 2.) What is the underlying theme of the political cartoon? 3.) When reflecting on the results of the 2016 Presidential Election and the struggles of the GOP to maintain a unified party platform, do you feel the shakeups that have occurred will results in positive changes for the Republican Party going forward or have they taken a major step back with how Donald Trump’s nomination has divided the party? *Thoroughly explain your position
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Video-What’s the difference between a caucus and a primary? (4:48 min)
  • Presentation –Chapter 7-Section 1-The Nominating Process
  • Student Led Notes-Chapter 7-Section 1-The Nominating Process
  • Daily Objective-
  • Content Objective:
    • SWD evaluation of the arguments for eliminating the Electoral College by evaluating a series of primary sources and responding to guided questions based off the text
    • SWD analysis of the political process in which candidates running for office seek and receive their party’s nomination by interacting in a short presentation and creating a set of student centered guided notes
  • Language Objective:
    • Students will read, and respond to a document based packet packed with arguments for eliminating the Electoral College by breaking down a series of primary sources and graphs to build an argument for eliminating the Electoral College
    • Students will read and record information pertaining to the political process in which candidates running for office seek and receive their party’s nomination through listening to a short lecture and creating student centered guided notes

 

Supplemental Materials: Presentation -Chapter 7-Section 1-The Nominating Process and Student Led Notes-Chapter 7-Section 1-The Nominating Process

 

Presentation -Chapter 7-Section 1-The Nominating Process

Chapter 7-The Electoral Process-2016

 

Student Led Notes-Chapter 7-Section 1-The Nominating Process

Chapter 7-Section 1-Guided Notes

 

U.S. History

Tuesday-11/14/17:

  • Bell Work- 1.) Who is speaking to Philip D. Strong in this excerpt? 2.) According to the passage, what did Bartolomeo Vanzetti feel his execution would accomplish that he might not have accomplished had he not been wrongfully convicted? 3.) If you had access to all of the resources in 1927 that we have today that suggests Sacco and Vanzetti may have actually been innocent, how might you deal with the fact that they were wrongfully executed?  
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Presentation-Chapter 12- Section 3-The Business of America
  • Thinking Map-American Consumerism-Tree Map
  • Outline Notes-Chapter 12-Section 3-The Business of America
  • Daily Objective-
  • Content Objective:
    • SWD synthesis of the growth in American business and travel in the 1920’s by interacting in a short presentation
  • Language Objective:
    • Students will read and record information pertaining the growth in American business and travel in the 1920’s through listening to a short lecture

 

Supplemental Materials: Presentation-Chapter 12- Section 3-The Business of America and Outline Notes-Chapter 12-Section 3-The Business of America

 

Presentation-Chapter 12- Section 3-The Business of America

Chapter 12-Section 3- The Businesses of America

 

Outline Notes-Chapter 12-Section 3-The Business of America

Notes-Outline-Chapter 12-Section 3

The Americans-Chapter 12-Section 3

 

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Government

Tuesday-11/14/17:

  • Bell Work-1.) What is the main idea of the excerpt shown above? 2.) Based on the document, what can we distinguish are the two factors that contributed to the expansion of democracy prior to the civil war? 3.) What do you think about the position the author takes towards the lowering of American suffrage qualifications? Why might this view lead to the continued restriction of suffrage?
  • Attendance- While Class is Doing Bell Work
  • Activity-Should the Electoral College Be Abolished-DBQ (10 to 15 min)
  • Vocabulary Frayer Model Activity-Chapter 7-The Election Process
  • Daily Objective-
  • Content Objective:
    • SWD analysis of key terms associated with the unit covering the federal election cycle in the United States by defining and personalizing vocabulary terms in a vocabulary based activity
  • Language Objective:
    • Students will read and record important vocabulary terms pertaining to our unit covering the federal election cycle in the United States through the use of a frayer model vocabulary activity

 

Supplemental Materials: Vocabulary Frayer Model Activity-Chapter 7-The Election Process  

Chapter 7-Vocabulary

Frayer Vocabulary Model