ATTENTION BATTLE OF THE BOOKS PARTICIPANTS

books

Exciting News! The iLearn classroom for the students to take the comprehension quizzes is up.

To access: go to https://lindbergh.dearbornschools.org and click on the Battle of the Books link at the top of the home page.

Students will login using their student ID number and passwords that they use on the Chromebooks at school.

Once they are logged in, they will need to enter the enrollment code to join the classroom: xdnt9n

Thank You,
Amy Fradkin and Nicole Bazzi

penguins

Jan. 17 – Late Start
Language NWEA

Jan. 18- Science NWEA
Jan. 24 – Math Test – Unit 6
Jan. 26 – End of 2nd marking period. 1/2 day for students.
Feb. 1 – January Home Reading Logs Due
Feb. 2 – Social Studies Unit 4 District Common Assessment

Remember that on any given day your fifth grader should be able to tell you what we did in school. The planner is a good reminder for them to help with this narrative. Sharing what they have learned each day is an excellent way to help students review.
The planner should be signed by a parent or guardian every day.

Homework might not always be a worksheet!!!!!
**Students should be working on multiplication facts every night.
**They should be working on Spelling City 10-15 minutes per night Monday – Thursday.
**Students should be reading 30 minutes each night. Their comprehension can be checked using the question sheet given to parents at conferences.
**Moby Max or Khan Academy- at least 20 minutes should be done each night.
**Students can use Ducksters or History.com to review social studies and/or science topics covered in class.
**Students will have assignments which need to be completed on Readworks.
**Content binders should come home every night so students can study and review that day’s lessons.
Math, social studies and science material in the binder should be studied each night to prepare for upcoming tests.

Math- Unit SixTentative Test Date- Jan. 24
****Use everyday situations at home or while shopping to discuss fractions. Have your student help double or triple recipes to practice using fractions. Find ways to compare fractions and/or decimals and percents while shopping. Help your student see how important these math skills are to everyday life.
In unit 6, students develop an understanding of the relationship between fractions and division. They will add and subtract fractions and relate finding common denominators to the idea that every fractions has many equivalent names.
Students will be able to:
**Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators (including mixed numbers) by replacing given fractions with equivalent fractions in such a way as to produce an equivalent sum or difference of fractions with like denominators. For example, 2/3 + 5/4 = 8/12 + 15/12 = 23/12. (In general, a/b + c/d = (ad + bc)/bd.)
**Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the same whole, including cases of unlike denominators, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem. Use benchmark fractions and number sense of fractions.
**Interpret a fraction as division of the numerator by the denominator (a/b = a ÷ b). Solve word problems involving division of whole numbers leading to answers in the form of fractions or mixed numbers, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem. For example, interpret 3/4 as the result of dividing 3 by 4, noting that 3/4 multiplied by 4 equals 3, and that when 3 wholes are shared equally among 4 people each person has a share of size 3/4. If 9 people want to share a 50-pound sack of rice equally by weight, how many pounds of rice should each person get? Between what two whole numbers does your answer lie?

cookies

Social Studies-
**Unit Test Feb. 2!!!

We begin our study of Unit 4:
**In this unit students examine the economic and political developments in the colonies prior to the end of the French and Indian War and assess how these developments affected life in the colonies. After reviewing the three colonial regions, students focus on the economic attributes of the colonies. They take an in-depth look at the Triangular Trade routes, including the Middle Passage, and its consequence for both continents. Students then explore the colonial labor force, noting differences between the New England and Southern colonies, and comparing the life of enslaved Africans and free Africans in the American colonies. Emphasis is placed on the effect of “one-crop economies” (plantation grown staple crops) in the south, and its influence on various groups of people and daily life in the Southern colonies. Students then shift their focus to New England and the Middle colonies, examining the diversity of economic activities and its affect on daily life in each region. Next, students investigate how colonial political experiences during the first half of the 18th Century influenced colonists’ views of their political rights and responsibilities. In doing so, they explore the shift of power from royal appointed governors to colonial representative assemblies and their influences on colonial life. Throughout the unit, students consider life in the British colonies from the perspectives of different groups of people including women, wealthy landowners, indentured servants, American Indians, free Africans, and enslaved Africans. Students explore how Africans living in North America drew upon their African past and adapted elements of new cultures to develop a distinct African-American culture. By the end of the unit, students construct generalizations about the reasons for regional differences in colonial America.

colonists dancing

Science
Dynamics of the Solar System

This earth science unit reinforces and extends the study of the sun, moon, and earth to objects within the solar system. Students explore the seasons and their relationship to the tilt of the earth on its axis and revolution around the sun. They define a year as one revolution around the sun. Students study the solar system and describe the position, motion, and relationship of the planets and other objects in the sky to the sun. They investigate the position of the moon in its orbit and it’s phases. Students observe and explain the apparent motion of the sun, moon and constellations across the sky due to the earth’s rotation and revolution. They study lunar and solar eclipses based on the relative positions of the sun, moon, and earth. Students relate ocean tides to the gravitational pull and orbit of the moon. They apply their knowledge of objects in the sky through various charts, illustrations, and models.

planets

Writing– Students continue conferring with their teacher regarding adjustment of their goals and projects. Stamina and independence continue to be emphasized as students strengthen their literacy skills. Students will use the writing process to construct opinion pieces.

Reading-
*Fiction-We are continuing a genre study of Mystery novels while we also continue to strengthen our Daily 5 routine.

dectective

*Non-fiction- We will begin working on the skill of identifying the central/main idea in a non-fiction piece.

Grammar – We will be learning about quotation marks and their proper usage in dialogue.

quotation marks

Spelling – Please see Spelling City for the current spelling list and activities.

polar bears

STEM event at UM for girls grades 4-6

http://outreach.umich.edu/programs/females-excelling-more-in-math-engineering-and-the-sciences-femmes/

The Females Excelling More in Math Engineering and Science (FEMMES) will be having a winter capstone event on Saturday, February 17​th, in which 4th-6th grade girls from the area participate in hands-on activities on the U of M campus meant to spark their enthusiasm and confidence in STEM. The girls hear from an influential female keynote speaker in STEM and take part in a series of workshops put on by University of Michigan students in STEM and their female professors. All activities, including lunch, are completely free for all participants!

Unit 4 Math retests must be done by Jan. 12th. The original retest date was Dec. 21st but I have extended the date. Please be aware that students not retesting will have the original test score used for report card grades.

retest

Math Unit 5 WILL NOT be retested.

Students who received a grade lower than 80% on the Chapter 4 Math Test still have the opportunity to retest. The retests must be done by Jan 12th. If you do not retest you will be graded on your report card based on the original score.

retest

happy new year

Jan. 10 – First Class & PBiS Assembly
Reading NWEA
Jan. 11 – Math NWEA
Jan. 15 – MLK Day- No School
Jan. 17 – Late Start
Language NWEA

Jan. 18- Science NWEA
Jan. 24 – Math Test – Unit 6
Jan. 26 – End of 2nd marking period. 1/2 day for students.
Feb. 1 – January Home Reading Logs Due
Feb. 2 – Social Studies Unit 4 District Common Assessment

Remember that on any given day your fifth grader should be able to tell you what we did in school. The planner is a good reminder for them to help with this narrative. Sharing what they have learned each day is an excellent way to help students review.
The planner should be signed by a parent or guardian every day.

Homework might not always be a worksheet!!!!!
**Students should be working on multiplication facts every night.
**They should be working on Spelling City 10-15 minutes per night Monday – Thursday.
**Students should be reading 30 minutes each night. Their comprehension can be checked using the question sheet given to parents at conferences.
**Moby Max or Khan Academy- at least 20 minutes should be done each night.
**Students can use Ducksters or History.com to review social studies and/or science topics covered in class.
**Students will have assignments which need to be completed on Readworks.
**Content binders should come home every night so students can study and review that day’s lessons.
Math, social studies and science material in the binder should be studied each night to prepare for upcoming tests.

Math- Unit SixTentative Test Date- Jan. 24
****Use everyday situations at home or while shopping to discuss fractions. Have your student help double or triple recipes to practice using fractions. Find ways to compare fractions and/or decimals and percents while shopping. Help your student see how important these math skills are to everyday life.
In unit 6, students develop an understanding of the relationship between fractions and division. They will add and subtract fractions and relate finding common denominators to the idea that every fractions has many equivalent names.
Students will be able to:
**Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators (including mixed numbers) by replacing given fractions with equivalent fractions in such a way as to produce an equivalent sum or difference of fractions with like denominators. For example, 2/3 + 5/4 = 8/12 + 15/12 = 23/12. (In general, a/b + c/d = (ad + bc)/bd.)
**Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the same whole, including cases of unlike denominators, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem. Use benchmark fractions and number sense of fractions.
**Interpret a fraction as division of the numerator by the denominator (a/b = a ÷ b). Solve word problems involving division of whole numbers leading to answers in the form of fractions or mixed numbers, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem. For example, interpret 3/4 as the result of dividing 3 by 4, noting that 3/4 multiplied by 4 equals 3, and that when 3 wholes are shared equally among 4 people each person has a share of size 3/4. If 9 people want to share a 50-pound sack of rice equally by weight, how many pounds of rice should each person get? Between what two whole numbers does your answer lie?

cookies

Social Studies-
***Unit Test Feb. 2!!!

We begin our study of Unit 4:
**In this unit students examine the economic and political developments in the colonies prior to the end of the French and Indian War and assess how these developments affected life in the colonies. After reviewing the three colonial regions, students focus on the economic attributes of the colonies. They take an in-depth look at the Triangular Trade routes, including the Middle Passage, and its consequence for both continents. Students then explore the colonial labor force, noting differences between the New England and Southern colonies, and comparing the life of enslaved Africans and free Africans in the American colonies. Emphasis is placed on the effect of “one-crop economies” (plantation grown staple crops) in the south, and its influence on various groups of people and daily life in the Southern colonies. Students then shift their focus to New England and the Middle colonies, examining the diversity of economic activities and its affect on daily life in each region. Next, students investigate how colonial political experiences during the first half of the 18th Century influenced colonists’ views of their political rights and responsibilities. In doing so, they explore the shift of power from royal appointed governors to colonial representative assemblies and their influences on colonial life. Throughout the unit, students consider life in the British colonies from the perspectives of different groups of people including women, wealthy landowners, indentured servants, American Indians, free Africans, and enslaved Africans. Students explore how Africans living in North America drew upon their African past and adapted elements of new cultures to develop a distinct African-American culture. By the end of the unit, students construct generalizations about the reasons for regional differences in colonial America.

colonists

Science
Dynamics of the Solar System

This earth science unit reinforces and extends the study of the sun, moon, and earth to objects within the solar system. Students explore the seasons and their relationship to the tilt of the earth on its axis and revolution around the sun. They define a year as one revolution around the sun. Students study the solar system and describe the position, motion, and relationship of the planets and other objects in the sky to the sun. They investigate the position of the moon in its orbit and it’s phases. Students observe and explain the apparent motion of the sun, moon and constellations across the sky due to the earth’s rotation and revolution. They study lunar and solar eclipses based on the relative positions of the sun, moon, and earth. Students relate ocean tides to the gravitational pull and orbit of the moon. They apply their knowledge of objects in the sky through various charts, illustrations, and models.

solar system

Writing– Students continue conferring with their teacher regarding adjustment of their goals and projects. Stamina and independence continue to be emphasized as students strengthen their literacy skills. Students will use the writing process to construct opinion pieces.

Reading-
*Fiction-We are beginning a genre study of Mystery novels while we also continue to develop our Daily 5 routine.

book

*Non-fiction- We will begin working on the skill of identifying the central/main idea in a non-fiction piece.

Grammar – We will be learning about quotation marks and their proper usage in dialogue.

quotation marks

Spelling – Please see Spelling City for the current spelling list and activities.

Hi all!! I hope you had a fabulous winter break and are rested and ready for school to begin again. I know I am looking forward to the new year and all the fun things we will learn from now until June!!

**Don’t forget that your Winter Break Reading Challenge paper is due tomorrow at 8:40!!

hot cocoa

**Please answer the following riddle in your planner for tomorrow.

Where does a snowman keep his money?

snowman

See you tomorrow bright and early!!!

morning snowman

The winter break reading challenge has been sent home with all students. Here is a copy of the two sheets that you can print if the sheets get misplaced. Be creative and find different places to read for 30 minutes!!! Happy reading!!!!!

Sheets are due on January 8th!!!!!!!

Winter Reading Challenge

Winter reading challenge marshmellows

Dec. 19- Native American “stay at school” field trip.
Dec. 20- Unit 5 Math Test
Dec. 21- Social Studies Unit 3 District Common Assessment
Dec. 21- Class celebration- 2:15. Please contact the room moms if you are interested in helping.
Dec. 22- PBiS December Reward
Dec. 22- Last day of school for 2017.

Remember that on any given day your fifth grader should be able to tell you what we did in school. The planner is a good reminder for them to help with this narrative. Sharing what they have learned each day is an excellent way to help students review.
The planner should be signed by a parent or guardian every day.

Homework might not always be a worksheet!!!!!
**Students should be working on multiplication facts every night.
**They should be working on Spelling City 10-15 minutes per night Monday – Thursday.
**Students should be reading 30 minutes each night. Their comprehension can be checked using the question sheet given to parents at conferences.
**Moby Max or Khan Academy- at least 20 minutes should be done each night.
**Students can use Ducksters or History.com to review social studies and/or science topics covered in class.
**Students will have assignments which need to be completed on Readworks.
**Content binders should come home every night so students can study and review that day’s lessons.
Math, social studies and science material in the binder should be studied each night to prepare for upcoming tests.

Math- Unit FiveTentative Test Date- Dec. 20
****Use everyday situations at home or while shopping to discuss fractions. Have your student help double or triple recipes to practice using fractions. Find ways to compare fractions and/or decimals and percents while shopping. Help your student see how important these math skills are to everyday life.

In Unit 5, students will spend time reviewing the meaning of fractions and converting them into decimals and percents. The objective is to concentrate on conversions among these notations, often emphasizing the fact that embedded in every fraction is a division problem. Fraction concepts explored are mixed numbers, comparing and ordering fractions, and finding equivalent fractions.

cookies

Social Studies-
***Unit Test Dec. 21!!!

We are continuing our study of Unit 3: Colonization and Settlement.
**In this unit students examine the causes and consequences of European settlement in North America during the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Throughout the unit, students use primary and secondary sources to examine how Europeans adapted to life in North America. Students begin the unit by exploring the reasons for European colonization and identifying the push and pull factors that caused people to migrate to the New World. Students next examine a variety of early settlements such as Roanoke, New Amsterdam, Jamestown, and Plymouth. In doing so, students explore how the reasons for migration and the physical geography of the New World influenced patterns of early colonial settlements and their development. Students explore the three distinct colonial regions: New England, Middle, and Southern colonies. They investigate significant developments in each colonial region, focusing on political institutions and economic activities. For example, in studying the growth political institutions, students explore the Mayflower Compact, colonial representative assemblies, the establishment of town meetings, and growth of royal government. Emphasis is also placed on the economic development of each region, including the establishment of staple-crop agricultural economies in the south and the growth of manufacturing and small farms in New England. Students also consider how regional economic differences influenced the use of slave labor in different colonial regions. In exploring the relationships between the European settlers and American Indians, students compare how the British and French differed in their interactions with indigenous peoples. In considering the Dutch settlements in New Netherlands, Quaker settlement in Pennsylvania, and the subsequent English takeover of the Middle colonies, students analyze immigration patterns that led to ethnic diversity. Students also assess the role of religion when exploring each colonial region. Throughout the unit, students gather and evaluate evidence to answer the question: Why did different colonial regions develop in North America?
**This week we will work on revising slideshows with the topic of the early English settlements of Roanoke, Jamestown, and Plymouth.
***Material in the binder should be studied each night as we work through the unit!!

Plymouth in winter

Writing– Students continue conferring with their teacher regarding adjustment of their goals and projects. Stamina and independence continue to be emphasized as students strengthen their literacy skills. Students will use the writing process to construct opinion pieces.

Reading-
*Fiction-We are beginning a genre study of graphic novels while we also continue to develop our Daily 5 routine.

graphic novels

*Non-fiction- We will begin working on the skill of identifying the central/main idea in a non-fiction piece.

Grammar – We will be doing a review of the different parts of speech.

Spelling – We will not have a list for 12/18 – 12/22. Please see Spelling City for the current spelling list and activities.

heat and freeze miser

Our class is planning a holiday book exchange during our Christmas Party. Please bring a new wrapped children’s book to school on Thursday Dec. 21st if you wish to participate. The book should cost no more than $7.00 and should be appealing to both boys and girls. At the party the children will drop the books in a bin and they will be randomly passed out. Please note that in order to receive a book you will need to bring a book.

books

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