Homework and Happenings 2-13-19

Class News:

  • Congratulations to the 19 students who received or were acknowledged at the Celebration Assembly today. I’m proud of all your improvements. 

These are our Mathematicians for last card marking. 

Ali Abokhalia-98%
Abdallah Mukahhal-94%
Mohammad Abouhassan-94%
Fatema Assaf-84%
Muna Baydoun-84%
Hassan Mcheik-84%
Malak AlQusairi-82%
Maryam AbuZahra-80%

These are our Math Masters!

1st-Nour Saad-100% 

2nd-Niyaa Almoamin-100%

3rd-Ahmad Sayed-98%

  • Decorate your white paper bag for Valentine’s Day tomorrow. We have 23 students in our class if you wish to bring a small treat. Make sure you write who it’s from.
  • Happy February birthdays to Maryam, Chadi, and Hassan!
  • Read Epic Calendar below and try to do the fun activities in your free time.
  • Show your parents your assessment folder and your planner with your new NWEA scores and DRA levels.

Weekly Happenings

Monday

2/11

#Kindness Is Cool

Tuesday

2/12

#Kindness Is Cool

Ecology Club

Wednesday

2/13

#Kindness Is Cool

School

Store

Thursday

2/14

#Kindness Is Cool

 

Half Day

 

Friday

2/15

#Kindness Is Cool

No School

 

Homework:

Math Homework: Zearn.org(10 minutes), Exact Path Math( 10 minutes) and do Math-a-thon practice on iLearn(10 minutes) 3 times-What’s your highest score?

Reading Homework: read for a total of 30 minutes your library books(1 fiction/1 non-fiction), books in book bag, www.epic.com (paid subscription after 5 p.m.), Exact Path Reading(10 minutes) and Exact Path Language(10 minutes), iLearn(Benchmark Universe), and google classroom. Read Scholastic News and answer the questions on the back. Do a 3-2-1 on article read and ABC brainstorming and summarize in reading notebook. Reading list is due every Friday.

  • Epic.com: https://www.getepic.com
  • Benchmark Universe on iLearn: https://moodle.dearbornschools.org/login/index.php
  • Exact Path Reading and Language: https://f2.app.edmentum.com/exactpath/
  • Vocabulary Notebook: Write the definition of 3 words from your word collector. Our goal is to learn 7-10 new words each day and use them in our speaking and writing vocabulary.
  • Spelling List:
  • illegible
  • comprehensible
  • sensible
  • visible
  • flexible
  • incredible
  • irresponsible
  • collapsible
  • horrible
  • terrible
  • impossible
  • gullible
  • convertible
  • destructible
  • digestible
  • concrete
  • gravitational
  • organizer
  • investigate
  • paraphrase
  • Studies: Identify the 50 states using your map and go on google classroom to read the social studies text there.
  • Science: Google classroom article a day through Newsela and Readworks.

image

Ms. Habhab’s 40 Book Challenge

 

Why Read 20 Minutes at Home?

Student A Reads

Student B Reads

Student C Reads

 20 minutes per day

 5 minutes per day

 1 minute per day

 3,600 minutes per school year

 900 minutes per school year

180 minutes per school year

1,800,000 words per year

 282,000 words per year

 8,000 words per year

Scores in the 90th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 50th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 10th percentile on standardized tests.

If they start reading for 20 minutes per night in Kindergarten, by the end of 6th grade, Student A will have read for the equivalent of 60 school days, Student B will have read for 12 school days, and Student C will have read for 3. (Nagy and Herman, 1987.)

Want to be a better reader? Simply, read!

Why read for 20 min.?

  • All 5th graders in Ms. Habhab’s class will be expected to read at least 40 books this year during independent reading at home.
  • You will be reading 40 (or more) books this year (beginning 9/7/18) and keeping track of the titles and genres on your Reading List sheet.
  • You will be reading from a variety of genres in order to explore books you might not ordinarily read, and to develop an understanding of literary elements, text features, and text structures.
  • Books that have been read (or will be read) in class cannot count, even if the student re-reads the book.
  • Students may ask the teacher, librarian, classmates, or their families for recommendations, but there are no specific title requirements
  • Any book with more than 200 pages will count as 2 books.
  • All books are selected by the student.
  • Select good fit books at your reading level. Use your DRA book graph as your guide and NWEA reading RIT score.
  • Use your Reading notebook to respond to your reading.
  • Each quarter you will be asked to present a “book talk” in front of the class for a grade.
  • Each week I will ask you about what you are reading, which books you have added to your list, which books you abandoned, and which ones you plan to read next.
  • Every Friday, you will turn in a completed Reading List.

Homework and Happenings 1-31-19

Class News:

  • Please sign your child’s spelling test from last Friday.
  • Reading list and cursive handwriting due Friday.
  • Turn in your multi-digit multiplication worksheet Friday.
  • We still have NWEA testing to complete. We still have language and science to take. Your child should have shown you their reading and math scores from NWEA in their assessment folder.

Weekly Happenings

Monday

1/28

#Kindness Is Cool

Snow Day

Tuesday

1/29

#Kindness Is Cool

Ecology Club

Wednesday

1/30

#Kindness Is Cool

School

Store

Snow Day

Thursday

1/31

#Kindness Is Cool

 

 

Snow Day

Friday

2/01

#Kindness Is Cool

 

 

Homework:

Math Homework: Zearn.org(10 minutes), Exact Path Math( 10 minutes) and do Math-a-thon practice on iLearn(10 minutes) 3 times-What’s your highest score?

Reading Homework: read for a total of 30 minutes your library books(1 fiction/1 non-fiction), books in book bag, www.epic.com (paid subscription after 5 p.m.), Exact Path Reading(10 minutes) and Exact Path Language(10 minutes), iLearn(Benchmark Universe), and google classroom. Read Scholastic News and answer the questions on the back. Do a 3-2-1 on article read and ABC brainstorming and summarize in reading notebook. Reading list is due every Friday.

  • Epic.com: https://www.getepic.com
  • Benchmark Universe on iLearn: https://moodle.dearbornschools.org/login/index.php
  • Exact Path Reading and Language: https://f2.app.edmentum.com/exactpath/
  • Vocabulary Notebook: Write the definition of 3 words from your word collector. Our goal is to learn 7-10 new words each day and use them in our speaking and writing to expand our vocabulary.
  • Spelling List:
  • requirement
  • frequent
  • impatient
  • absent
  • excellent
  • independent
  • compliment
  • violent
  • intelligent
  • obedient
  • fluorescent
  • equivalent
  • resident
  • persistent
  • environment
  • estimate
  • algorithm
  • conversion
  • frigid
  • routes
  • Social Studies: Identify the 50 states using your map and go on google classroom to read the social studies text there.
  • Science: Google classroom article a day through Newsela and Readworks.

image

Ms. Habhab’s 40 Book Challenge

 

Why Read 20 Minutes at Home?

Student A Reads

Student B Reads

Student C Reads

 20 minutes per day

 5 minutes per day

 1 minute per day

 3,600 minutes per school year

 900 minutes per school year

180 minutes per school year

1,800,000 words per year

 282,000 words per year

 8,000 words per year

Scores in the 90th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 50th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 10th percentile on standardized tests.

If they start reading for 20 minutes per night in Kindergarten, by the end of 6th grade, Student A will have read for the equivalent of 60 school days, Student B will have read for 12 school days, and Student C will have read for 3. (Nagy and Herman, 1987.)

Want to be a better reader? Simply, read!

Why read for 20 min.?

  • All 5th graders in Ms. Habhab’s class will be expected to read at least 40 books this year during independent reading at home.
  • You will be reading 40 (or more) books this year (beginning 9/7/18) and keeping track of the titles and genres on your Reading List sheet.
  • You will be reading from a variety of genres in order to explore books you might not ordinarily read, and to develop an understanding of literary elements, text features, and text structures.
  • Books that have been read (or will be read) in class cannot count, even if the student re-reads the book.
  • Students may ask the teacher, librarian, classmates, or their families for recommendations, but there are no specific title requirements
  • Any book with more than 200 pages will count as 2 books.
  • All books are selected by the student.
  • Select good fit books at your reading level. Use your DRA book graph as your guide and NWEA reading RIT score.
  • Use your Reading notebook to respond to your reading.
  • Each quarter you will be asked to present a “book talk” in front of the class for a grade.
  • Each week I will ask you about what you are reading, which books you have added to your list, which books you abandoned, and which ones you plan to read next.
  • Every Friday, you will turn in a completed Reading List.

Week of 12-31-18 to 1-4-19

Class News: 

  • Christmas break is from Monday, December 24 to Monday, January 7th. School begins on Monday, Jan. 7th, 2019.
  • Happy New Year!
  • Please complete the second side of your reading list this week using your library books, epic.com, or google classroom.
  • Complete your explorer power point or google slides with your partner. The guidelines for the power point are in google classroom.

Weekly Happenings

Monday

12/31

#Kindness Is Cool

No School

Tuesday

1/01

#Kindness Is Cool

No School

Wednesday

1/02

#Kindness Is Cool

No School

Thursday

1/03

#Kindness Is Cool

No School

 

 

Friday

1/04

#Kindness Is Cool

No School

 

Homework:

Math Homework: Zearn.org(10 minutes), Exact Path Math( 10 minutes) and do Math-a-thon practice on iLearn(10 minutes) 3 times-What’s your highest score?

Reading Homework: read for a total of 30 minutes your library books(1 fiction/1 non-fiction), books in book bag, www.epic.com (paid subscription after 5 p.m.), Exact Path Reading(10 minutes) and Exact Path Language(10 minutes), iLearn(Benchmark Universe), and google classroom. Read Scholastic News and answer the questions on the back. Do a 3-2-1 on article read and ABC brainstorming and summarize in reading notebook. Reading list is due every Friday.

  • Social Studies: Identify the 50 states using your map and go on google classroom to read the social studies text there.
  • Science: Google classroom article a day through Newsela and Readworks.

image

Ms. Habhab’s 40 Book Challenge

 

Why Read 20 Minutes at Home?

Student A Reads

Student B Reads

Student C Reads

 20 minutes per day

 5 minutes per day

 1 minute per day

 3,600 minutes per school year

 900 minutes per school year

180 minutes per school year

1,800,000 words per year

 282,000 words per year

 8,000 words per year

Scores in the 90th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 50th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 10th percentile on standardized tests.

If they start reading for 20 minutes per night in Kindergarten, by the end of 6th grade, Student A will have read for the equivalent of 60 school days, Student B will have read for 12 school days, and Student C will have read for 3. (Nagy and Herman, 1987.)

Want to be a better reader? Simply, read!

Why read for 20 min.?

  • All 5th graders in Ms. Habhab’s class will be expected to read at least 40 books this year during independent reading at home.
  • You will be reading 40 (or more) books this year (beginning 9/7/18) and keeping track of the titles and genres on your Reading List sheet.
  • You will be reading from a variety of genres in order to explore books you might not ordinarily read, and to develop an understanding of literary elements, text features, and text structures.
  • Books that have been read (or will be read) in class cannot count, even if the student re-reads the book.
  • Students may ask the teacher, librarian, classmates, or their families for recommendations, but there are no specific title requirements
  • Any book with more than 200 pages will count as 2 books.
  • All books are selected by the student.
  • Select good fit books at your reading level. Use your DRA book graph as your guide and NWEA reading RIT score.
  • Use your Reading notebook to respond to your reading.
  • Each quarter you will be asked to present a “book talk” in front of the class for a grade.
  • Each week I will ask you about what you are reading, which books you have added to your list, which books you abandoned, and which ones you plan to read next.
  • Every Friday, you will turn in a completed Reading List.

Weekly Objectives 12-17-18 to 12-21-18

Class News: 

  • Spelling test is tomorrow.
  • Reading list and cursive handwriting due tomorrow.
  • Congratulations 5th grade for winning the milk carton contest! Your prize is a delicious smoothie made out of milk tomorrow!
  • School Sing Along is tomorrow in the p.m..
  • Christmas break is from Monday, December 24 to Monday, January 7th. School begins on Monday, Jan. 7th, 2019.

Weekly Happenings

Monday

12/17

#Kindness Is Cool

Spirit Week: Dress to Impress

Tuesday

12/18

#Kindness Is Cool

Spirit Week:

Sports Shirt/Oakman Shirt

Volley Ball Game

Wednesday

12/19

#Kindness Is Cool

Spirit Week:

Be a Scientist

Science Assembly

Thursday

12/20

#Kindness Is Cool

Spirit Week:

Pajama Day

 

 

Friday

12/21

#Kindness Is Cool

Spirit Week:

Holiday Colors

School Sing Along

 

Ecology Club

School Store

 

 

Homework:

Math Homework: Zearn.org(10 minutes), Exact Path Math( 10 minutes) and do Math-a-thon practice on iLearn(10 minutes) 3 times-What’s your highest score?

Reading Homework: read for a total of 30 minutes your library books(1 fiction/1 non-fiction), books in book bag, www.epic.com (paid subscription after 5 p.m.), Exact Path Reading(10 minutes) and Exact Path Language(10 minutes), iLearn(Benchmark Universe), and google classroom. Read Scholastic News and answer the questions on the back. Do a 3-2-1 on article read and ABC brainstorming and summarize in reading notebook. Reading list is due every Friday.

  • Epic.com: https://www.getepic.com
  • Benchmark Universe on iLearn: https://moodle.dearbornschools.org/login/index.php
  • Exact Path Reading and Language: https://f2.app.edmentum.com/exactpath/
  • Vocabulary Notebook: Write the definition of 3 words from your word collector. Our goal is to learn 7-10 new words each day and use them in our speaking and writing to expand our vocabulary.
  • Spelling List:
  • forgetting
  • quizzing
  • upsetting
  • equipping
  • regretting
  • wrapping
  • beginning
  • compelling
  • dropping
  • snapping
  • shopping
  • swimming
  • omitting
  • transferring
  • begging
  • setting
  • landforms
  • distribute
  • celebration
  • solution
  • Social Studies: Identify the 50 states using your map and go on google classroom to read the social studies text there.
  • Science: Google classroom article a day through Newsela and Readworks.

image

Ms. Habhab’s 40 Book Challenge

 

Why Read 20 Minutes at Home?

Student A Reads

Student B Reads

Student C Reads

 20 minutes per day

 5 minutes per day

 1 minute per day

 3,600 minutes per school year

 900 minutes per school year

180 minutes per school year

1,800,000 words per year

 282,000 words per year

 8,000 words per year

Scores in the 90th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 50th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 10th percentile on standardized tests.

If they start reading for 20 minutes per night in Kindergarten, by the end of 6th grade, Student A will have read for the equivalent of 60 school days, Student B will have read for 12 school days, and Student C will have read for 3. (Nagy and Herman, 1987.)

Want to be a better reader? Simply, read!

Why read for 20 min.?

  • All 5th graders in Ms. Habhab’s class will be expected to read at least 40 books this year during independent reading at home.
  • You will be reading 40 (or more) books this year (beginning 9/7/18) and keeping track of the titles and genres on your Reading List sheet.
  • You will be reading from a variety of genres in order to explore books you might not ordinarily read, and to develop an understanding of literary elements, text features, and text structures.
  • Books that have been read (or will be read) in class cannot count, even if the student re-reads the book.
  • Students may ask the teacher, librarian, classmates, or their families for recommendations, but there are no specific title requirements
  • Any book with more than 200 pages will count as 2 books.
  • All books are selected by the student.
  • Select good fit books at your reading level. Use your DRA book graph as your guide and NWEA reading RIT score.
  • Use your Reading notebook to respond to your reading.
  • Each quarter you will be asked to present a “book talk” in front of the class for a grade.
  • Each week I will ask you about what you are reading, which books you have added to your list, which books you abandoned, and which ones you plan to read next.
  • Every Friday, you will turn in a completed Reading List

Reading Objectives:

RI.5.2 Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.

RF.5.4a Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.

RI.5.3 Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

RL.5.2 Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.

 

Writing Objectives:

W.5.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.
  3. Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events.
  4. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or event.

 

W.5.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

 

W.5.5 With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

 

W.5.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Math Objectives:

5.NBT.1 Domain: Number & Operations in Base Ten

Recognize that in a multi-digit number, a digit in one place represents 10 times as much as it represents in the place to its right and 1/10 of what it represents in the place to its left.

5.NBT.2 Domain: Number & Operations in Base Ten

Explain patterns in the number of zeros of the product when multiplying a number by powers of 10, and explain patterns in the placement of the decimal point when a decimal is multiplied or divided by a power of 10. Use whole-number exponents to denote powers of 10.

5.NBT.5 Domain: Number & Operations in Base Ten

Fluently multiply multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.

5.OA.1 Domain: Operations & Algebraic Thinking

Use parentheses, brackets, or braces in numerical expressions, and evaluate expressions with these symbols

5.OA.2 Domain: Operations & Algebraic Thinking

Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers, and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them. For example, express the calculation “add 8 and 7, then multiply by 2” as 2 × (8 + 7). Recognize that 3 × (18932 + 921) is three times as large as 18932 + 921, without having to calculate the indicated sum or product.

Science Objectives:

ESS2-1 Develop a model using an example to describe ways the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact.

5-ESS2-2  Describe and graph the amounts and percentages of water and fresh water in various reservoirs to provide evidence about the distribution of water on Earth.

5-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment.

Social Studies Objectives:

U1.1.1:  Use maps to locate peoples in the desert Southwest, the Pacific Northwest, the nomadic nations of the Great Plains, and the woodland peoples east of the Mississippi River (Eastern Woodland).

 5 – U1.1.2:  Compare how American Indians in the desert Southwest and the Pacific Northwest adapted to or modified the environment.

 5 – U1.3.1:  Use maps to locate the major regions of Africa (northern Africa, western Africa, central Africa, eastern Africa, southern Africa).

  5 – U1.3.2:  Describe the life and cultural development of people living in western Africa before the 16th century with respect to economic (the ways people made a living) and family structures, and the growth of states, towns, and trade.

 

Weekly Objectives 12-10-18 to 12-14-18

Class News:

  • Spelling test tomorrow.
  • Reading list, spelling sentences, and cursive handwriting due tomorrow.
  • Book order forms due on Friday.

Weekly Happenings

Monday

12/17

#Kindness Is Cool

Spirit Week: Dress to Impress

Tuesday

12/18

#Kindness Is Cool

Spirit Week:

Sports Shirt/Oakman Shirt

Volley Ball Game

Wednesday

12/19

#Kindness Is Cool

Spirit Week:

Be a Scientist

Science Assembly

Thursday

12/20

#Kindness Is Cool

Spirit Week:

Pajama Day

 

 

Friday

12/21

#Kindness Is Cool

Spirit Week:

Holiday Colors

School Sing Along

 

Ecology Club

School Store

 

 

Homework:

Math Homework: Zearn.org(10 minutes), Exact Path Math( 10 minutes) and do Math-a-thon practice on iLearn(10 minutes) 3 times-What’s your highest score?

Reading Homework: read for a total of 30 minutes your library books(1 fiction/1 non-fiction), books in book bag, www.epic.com (paid subscription after 5 p.m.), Exact Path Reading(10 minutes) and Exact Path Language(10 minutes), iLearn(Benchmark Universe), and google classroom. Read Scholastic News and answer the questions on the back. Do a 3-2-1 on article read and ABC brainstorming and summarize in reading notebook. Reading list is due every Friday.

  • Epic.com: https://www.getepic.com
  • Benchmark Universe on iLearn: https://moodle.dearbornschools.org/login/index.php
  • Exact Path Reading and Language: https://f2.app.edmentum.com/exactpath/
  • Vocabulary Notebook: Write the definition of 3 words from your word collector. Our goal is to learn 7-10 new words each day and use them in our speaking and writing to expand our vocabulary.
  • Spelling List:
  • concurred
  • admitted
  • gripped
  • referred
  • controlled
  • permitted
  • omitted
  • preferred
  • occurred
  • stopped
  • starred
  • strapped
  • flagged
  • tripped
  • planned
  • routes
  • diseases
  • multiply
  • details
  • chronologic
  • Social Studies: Identify the 50 states using your map and go on google classroom to read the social studies text there.
  • Science: Google classroom article a day through Newsela and Readworks.

image

Ms. Habhab’s 40 Book Challenge

 

Why Read 20 Minutes at Home?

Student A Reads

Student B Reads

Student C Reads

 20 minutes per day

 5 minutes per day

 1 minute per day

 3,600 minutes per school year

 900 minutes per school year

180 minutes per school year

1,800,000 words per year

 282,000 words per year

 8,000 words per year

Scores in the 90th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 50th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 10th percentile on standardized tests.

If they start reading for 20 minutes per night in Kindergarten, by the end of 6th grade, Student A will have read for the equivalent of 60 school days, Student B will have read for 12 school days, and Student C will have read for 3. (Nagy and Herman, 1987.)

Want to be a better reader? Simply, read!

Why read for 20 min.?

  • All 5th graders in Ms. Habhab’s class will be expected to read at least 40 books this year during independent reading at home.
  • You will be reading 40 (or more) books this year (beginning 9/7/18) and keeping track of the titles and genres on your Reading List sheet.
  • You will be reading from a variety of genres in order to explore books you might not ordinarily read, and to develop an understanding of literary elements, text features, and text structures.
  • Books that have been read (or will be read) in class cannot count, even if the student re-reads the book.
  • Students may ask the teacher, librarian, classmates, or their families for recommendations, but there are no specific title requirements
  • Any book with more than 200 pages will count as 2 books.
  • All books are selected by the student.
  • Select good fit books at your reading level. Use your DRA book graph as your guide and NWEA reading RIT score.
  • Use your Reading notebook to respond to your reading.
  • Each quarter you will be asked to present a “book talk” in front of the class for a grade.
  • Each week I will ask you about what you are reading, which books you have added to your list, which books you abandoned, and which ones you plan to read next.
  • Every Friday, you will turn in a completed Reading List

Reading Objectives:

RI.5.2 Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.

RF.5.4a Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.

RI.5.3 Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

RL.5.2 Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text.

 

Writing Objectives:

W.5.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.
  3. Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events.
  4. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or event.

 

W.5.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

 

W.5.5 With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

 

W.5.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Math Objectives:

5.NBT.1 Domain: Number & Operations in Base Ten

Recognize that in a multi-digit number, a digit in one place represents 10 times as much as it represents in the place to its right and 1/10 of what it represents in the place to its left.

5.NBT.2 Domain: Number & Operations in Base Ten

Explain patterns in the number of zeros of the product when multiplying a number by powers of 10, and explain patterns in the placement of the decimal point when a decimal is multiplied or divided by a power of 10. Use whole-number exponents to denote powers of 10.

5.NBT.5 Domain: Number & Operations in Base Ten

Fluently multiply multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.

5.OA.1 Domain: Operations & Algebraic Thinking

Use parentheses, brackets, or braces in numerical expressions, and evaluate expressions with these symbols

5.OA.2 Domain: Operations & Algebraic Thinking

Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers, and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them. For example, express the calculation “add 8 and 7, then multiply by 2” as 2 × (8 + 7). Recognize that 3 × (18932 + 921) is three times as large as 18932 + 921, without having to calculate the indicated sum or product.

Science Objectives:

ESS2-1 Develop a model using an example to describe ways the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact.

5-ESS2-2  Describe and graph the amounts and percentages of water and fresh water in various reservoirs to provide evidence about the distribution of water on Earth.

5-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment.

Social Studies Objectives:

U1.1.1:  Use maps to locate peoples in the desert Southwest, the Pacific Northwest, the nomadic nations of the Great Plains, and the woodland peoples east of the Mississippi River (Eastern Woodland).

 5 – U1.1.2:  Compare how American Indians in the desert Southwest and the Pacific Northwest adapted to or modified the environment.

 5 – U1.3.1:  Use maps to locate the major regions of Africa (northern Africa, western Africa, central Africa, eastern Africa, southern Africa).

  5 – U1.3.2:  Describe the life and cultural development of people living in western Africa before the 16th century with respect to economic (the ways people made a living) and family structures, and the growth of states, towns, and trade.

 

Weekly Objectives 12-3-18 to 12-7-18

page1image3905858640

 

  • Class News:
  • Wednesday, Dec. 12th is Late Start.
  • We have a music concert on December 13th at 2 p.m.. Parents please join us.
  • Book order forms due on Friday.

Weekly Happenings

Monday

12/3

#Kindness Is Cool

Tuesday

12/4

#Kindness Is Cool

Assembly @ 2-Jump with Jill

Wednesday

12/5

#Kindness Is Cool

Picture Re-Takes

Assembly @2:30

Thursday

12/6

#Kindness Is Cool

 

 

 

Friday

12/7

#Kindness Is Cool

 

 

 

Ecology Club

School Store

 

 

Homework:

Math Homework: Zearn.org(10 minutes), Exact Path Math( 10 minutes) and do Math-a-thon practice on iLearn(10 minutes) 3 times-What’s your highest score?

Reading Homework: read for a total of 30 minutes your library books(1 fiction/1 non-fiction), books in book bag, www.epic.com (paid subscription after 5 p.m.), Exact Path Reading(10 minutes) and Exact Path Language(10 minutes), iLearn(Benchmark Universe), and google classroom. Read Scholastic News and answer the questions on the back. Do a 3-2-1 on article read and ABC brainstorming and summarize in reading notebook. Reading list is due every Friday.

  • Social Studies: Identify the 50 states using your map and go on google classroom to read the social studies text there.
  • Science: Google classroom article a day through Newsela and Readworks.

image

Ms. Habhab’s 40 Book Challenge

 

Why Read 20 Minutes at Home?

Student A Reads

Student B Reads

Student C Reads

 20 minutes per day

 5 minutes per day

 1 minute per day

 3,600 minutes per school year

 900 minutes per school year

180 minutes per school year

1,800,000 words per year

 282,000 words per year

 8,000 words per year

Scores in the 90th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 50th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 10th percentile on standardized tests.

If they start reading for 20 minutes per night in Kindergarten, by the end of 6th grade, Student A will have read for the equivalent of 60 school days, Student B will have read for 12 school days, and Student C will have read for 3. (Nagy and Herman, 1987.)

Want to be a better reader? Simply, read!

Why read for 20 min.?

  • All 5th graders in Ms. Habhab’s class will be expected to read at least 40 books this year during independent reading at home.
  • You will be reading 40 (or more) books this year (beginning 9/7/18) and keeping track of the titles and genres on your Reading List sheet.
  • You will be reading from a variety of genres in order to explore books you might not ordinarily read, and to develop an understanding of literary elements, text features, and text structures.
  • Books that have been read (or will be read) in class cannot count, even if the student re-reads the book.
  • Students may ask the teacher, librarian, classmates, or their families for recommendations, but there are no specific title requirements
  • Any book with more than 200 pages will count as 2 books.
  • All books are selected by the student.
  • Select good fit books at your reading level. Use your DRA book graph as your guide and NWEA reading RIT score.
  • Use your Reading notebook to respond to your reading.
  • Each quarter you will be asked to present a “book talk” in front of the class for a grade.
  • Each week I will ask you about what you are reading, which books you have added to your list, which books you abandoned, and which ones you plan to read next.
  • Every Friday, you will turn in a completed Reading List

Reading Objectives:

RI.5.2 Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.

RF.5.4a Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.

RI.5.3 Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

Writing Objectives:

W.5.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.
  3. Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events.
  4. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or event.

 

W.5.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

 

W.5.5 With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

 

W.5.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Math Objectives:

5.NBT.1 Domain: Number & Operations in Base Ten

Recognize that in a multi-digit number, a digit in one place represents 10 times as much as it represents in the place to its right and 1/10 of what it represents in the place to its left.

5.NBT.2 Domain: Number & Operations in Base Ten

Explain patterns in the number of zeros of the product when multiplying a number by powers of 10, and explain patterns in the placement of the decimal point when a decimal is multiplied or divided by a power of 10. Use whole-number exponents to denote powers of 10.

5.NBT.5 Domain: Number & Operations in Base Ten

Fluently multiply multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.

5.OA.1 Domain: Operations & Algebraic Thinking

Use parentheses, brackets, or braces in numerical expressions, and evaluate expressions with these symbols

5.OA.2 Domain: Operations & Algebraic Thinking

Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers, and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them. For example, express the calculation “add 8 and 7, then multiply by 2” as 2 × (8 + 7). Recognize that 3 × (18932 + 921) is three times as large as 18932 + 921, without having to calculate the indicated sum or product.

Science Objectives:

ESS2-1 Develop a model using an example to describe ways the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact.

5-ESS2-2  Describe and graph the amounts and percentages of water and fresh water in various reservoirs to provide evidence about the distribution of water on Earth.

5-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment.

Social Studies Objectives:

U1.1.1:  Use maps to locate peoples in the desert Southwest, the Pacific Northwest, the nomadic nations of the Great Plains, and the woodland peoples east of the Mississippi River (Eastern Woodland).

 5 – U1.1.2:  Compare how American Indians in the desert Southwest and the Pacific Northwest adapted to or modified the environment.

 5 – U1.3.1:  Use maps to locate the major regions of Africa (northern Africa, western Africa, central Africa, eastern Africa, southern Africa).

  5 – U1.3.2:  Describe the life and cultural development of people living in western Africa before the 16th century with respect to economic (the ways people made a living) and family structures, and the growth of states, towns, and trade.

 

Weekly Objectives 11-26 to 11-30-18

  • My email is habhabn@dearbornschools.org

 

  • Class News:
    • Tomorrow is the Parent Meeting-  Friday, November 30th at 1:30 p.m. in room 200. We called you today to remind you to join us tomorrow for some useful reading activities your child should be doing to increase their reading skills.  
    • We have a music concert on December 13th at 2 p.m.. 

Weekly Happenings

Monday

11/26

#Kindness Is Cool

Tuesday

11/27

#Kindness Is Cool

Wednesday

11/28

#Kindness Is Cool

Thursday

11/29

#Kindness Is Cool

 

 

 

Friday

11/30

#Kindness Is Cool

5th Grade Parent Meeting

 

 

Ecology Club

School Store

 

 

 

  • Homework
  • Math: Zearn.org and Exact Path Math(based on your math RIT score) -Spend 30 minutes each night. Do Math-a-thon on iLearn. We will have 50 questions on Tuesday, November 26th to complete in 4 minutes.
  • Succeed Math Book: pages 79-80 (examples), pages. 81-82 (Do-practice problems)
  • Reading: read for 30 minutes your library books, books in book bag, www.epic.com (paid subscription), Exact Path Reading and Language(through Clever on DPS website), iLearn(Benchmark Universe), and google classroom. Read Scholastic News and answer the questions on the back. Reading list is due every Friday.
  • Vocabulary Notebook: Write the definition of 3 words from your word collector. Our goal is to learn 7-10 new words each day and use them in our speaking and writing to expand our vocabulary.
  • Spelling List:
  • cruel
  • novel
  • quarrel
  • fossil
  • label
  • pupil
  • apparel
  • channel
  • pencil
  • cancel
  • utensil
  • nostril
  • level
  • squirrel
  • pretzel
  • division
  • divisor
  • dividend
  • quotient
  • model

 

  • Social Studies: Identify the 50 states using your map and go on google classroom to read the social studies text there.
  • Science: Google classroom article a day through Newsela and readworks.
  • Book order forms due on Friday.

 

Ms. Habhab’s 40 Book Challenge

 

Why Read 20 Minutes at Home?

Student A Reads

Student B Reads

Student C Reads

 20 minutes per day

 5 minutes per day

 1 minute per day

 3,600 minutes per school year

 900 minutes per school year

180 minutes per school year

1,800,000 words per year

 282,000 words per year

 8,000 words per year

Scores in the 90th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 50th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 10th percentile on standardized tests.

If they start reading for 20 minutes per night in Kindergarten, by the end of 6th grade, Student A will have read for the equivalent of 60 school days, Student B will have read for 12 school days, and Student C will have read for 3. (Nagy and Herman, 1987.)

Want to be a better reader? Simply, read!

Why read for 20 min.?

  • All 5th graders in Ms. Habhab’s class will be expected to read at least 40 books this year during independent reading at home.
  • You will be reading 40 (or more) books this year (beginning 9/7/17) and keeping track of the titles and genres on your Reading List sheet.
  • You will be reading from a variety of genres in order to explore books you might not ordinarily read, and to develop an understanding of literary elements, text features, and text structures.
  • Books that have been read (or will be read) in class cannot count, even if the student re-reads the book.
  • Students may ask the teacher, librarian, classmates, or their families for recommendations, but there are no specific title requirements
  • Any book with more than 200 pages will count as 2 books.
  • All books are selected by the student.
  • Select good fit books at your reading level. Use your DRA book graph as your guide and NWEA reading RIT score.
  • Use your Reading notebook to respond to your reading.
  • Each quarter you will be asked to present a “book talk” in front of the class for a grade.
  • Each week I will ask you about what you are reading, which books you have added to your list, which books you abandoned, and which ones you plan to read next.
  • Every Friday, you will turn in a completed Reading List

Reading Objectives:

RI.5.2 Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.

RF.5.4a Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.

RI.5.3 Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

Writing Objectives:

W.5.1

Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

  1. Introduce a topic/text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped.
  2. Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details.
  3. Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently, specifically).
  4. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.

W.5.4

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.5.5

With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing.

W.5.10

Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames.

Math Objectives:

5.NBT.1Domain: Number & Operations in Base Ten

Recognize that in a multi-digit number, a digit in one place represents 10 times as much as it represents in the place to its right and 1/10 of what it represents in the place to its left.

5.NBT.2Domain: Number & Operations in Base Ten

Explain patterns in the number of zeros of the product when multiplying a number by powers of 10, and explain patterns in the placement of the decimal point when a decimal is multiplied or divided by a power of 10. Use whole-number exponents to denote powers of 10.

5.NBT.5Domain: Number & Operations in Base Ten

Fluently multiply multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.

5.OA.1Domain: Operations & Algebraic Thinking

Use parentheses, brackets, or braces in numerical expressions, and evaluate expressions with these symbols

5.OA.2Domain: Operations & Algebraic Thinking

Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers, and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them. For example, express the calculation “add 8 and 7, then multiply by 2” as 2 × (8 + 7). Recognize that 3 × (18932 + 921) is three times as large as 18932 + 921, without having to calculate the indicated sum or product.

Science Objectives:

5-ESS2-1 Develop a model using an example to describe ways the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact.

5-ESS2-2  Describe and graph the amounts and percentages of water and fresh water in various reservoirs to provide evidence about the distribution of water on Earth.

5-ESS3-1 Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment.

Social Studies Objectives:

U1.1.1: Use maps to locate peoples in the desert Southwest, the Pacific Northwest, the nomadic nations of the Great Plains, and the woodland peoples east of the Mississippi River (Eastern Woodland).

 5 – U1.1.2:Compare how American Indians in the desert Southwest and the Pacific Northwest adapted to or modified the environment.

  5 – U1.3.1:Use maps to locate the major regions of Africa (northern Africa, western Africa, central Africa, eastern Africa, southern Africa).

  5 – U1.3.2:  Describe the life and cultural development of people living in western Africa before the 16th century with respect to economic (the ways people made a living) and family structures, and the growth of states, towns, and trade.

Happy Thanksgiving 11-20-18

  • My email is habhabn@dearbornschools.org

 

  • Class News:
    • No School Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday of this week. Happy Thanksgiving!
    • Spelling Test will be on Monday, November 26th.
    • Reading list, cursive handwriting, and frayer model due on Monday, November 26th.
    • We have a music concert on December 13th at 2 p.m.. A note was sent home with your child. Please read it.
    • Thank you parents for caring about your child’s academics and coming to the parent meeting. Please make sure your child is using zearn.com  and exact path every night including the weekend.
    • Next Parent Meeting is Friday, November 30th at 1:30 p.m..

 

  • Homework
  • Math: Zearn.org and Exact Path Math(based on your math RIT score) -Spend 30 minutes each night. Do Math-a-thon on iLearn. We will have 50 questions on Tuesday, November 26th to complete in 4 minutes.
  • Succeed Math Book: pages (examples),  (Do-practice problems)
  • Reading: read for 30 minutes your library books, books in book bag, www.epic.com (paid subscription), Exact Path Reading and Language(through Clever on DPS website), iLearn(Benchmark Universe), and google classroom. Read Scholastic News and answer the questions on the back. Reading list is due every Friday.
  • Vocabulary Notebook: Write the definition of 3 words from your word collector. Our goal is to learn 7-10 new words each day and use them in our speaking and writing to expand our vocabulary.
  • Spelling List:
  • article
  • shuffle
  • vehicle
  • sterile
  • bundle
  • pickle
  • mobile
  • hostile
  • bicycle
  • whistle
  • percentile
  • particle
  • sample
  • simple
  • meanwhile
  • region
  • climate
  • culture
  • century
  • supporting

 

  • Social Studies: Identify the 50 states using your map and go on google classroom to read the social studies text there.
  • Science: Google classroom article a day through Newsela and readworks.
  • Book order forms due on Friday.

Weekly Happenings

Monday

11/19

#Kindness Is Cool

Tuesday

11/20

#Kindness Is Cool

Wednesday

11/21

#Kindness Is Cool

No School

Thursday

11/22

#Kindness Is Cool

No School

 

 

Friday

11/23

#Kindness Is Cool

No School

 

 

Ecology Club

School Store

 

 

Ms. Habhab’s 40 Book Challenge

 

Why Read 20 Minutes at Home?

Student A Reads

Student B Reads

Student C Reads

 20 minutes per day

 5 minutes per day

 1 minute per day

 3,600 minutes per school year

 900 minutes per school year

180 minutes per school year

1,800,000 words per year

 282,000 words per year

 8,000 words per year

Scores in the 90th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 50th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 10th percentile on standardized tests.

If they start reading for 20 minutes per night in Kindergarten, by the end of 6th grade, Student A will have read for the equivalent of 60 school days, Student B will have read for 12 school days, and Student C will have read for 3. (Nagy and Herman, 1987.)

Want to be a better reader? Simply, read!

Why read for 20 min.?

  • All 5th graders in Ms. Habhab’s class will be expected to read at least 40 books this year during independent reading at home.
  • You will be reading 40 (or more) books this year (beginning 9/7/17) and keeping track of the titles and genres on your Reading List sheet.
  • You will be reading from a variety of genres in order to explore books you might not ordinarily read, and to develop an understanding of literary elements, text features, and text structures.
  • Books that have been read (or will be read) in class cannot count, even if the student re-reads the book.
  • Students may ask the teacher, librarian, classmates, or their families for recommendations, but there are no specific title requirements
  • Any book with more than 200 pages will count as 2 books.
  • All books are selected by the student.
  • Select good fit books at your reading level. Use your DRA book graph as your guide and NWEA reading RIT score.
  • Use your Reading notebook to respond to your reading.
  • Each quarter you will be asked to present a “book talk” in front of the class for a grade.
  • Each week I will ask you about what you are reading, which books you have added to your list, which books you abandoned, and which ones you plan to read next.
  • Every Friday, you will turn in a completed Reading List

 

Weekly Objectives 11-19-18

  • My email is habhabn@dearbornschools.org

 

  • Class News:
    • No School Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday of this week. Happy Thanksgiving!
    • Spelling Test will be on Monday, November 26th.
    • Reading list, cursive handwriting, and frayer model due on Monday, November 26th.
    • We have a music concert on December 13th at 2 p.m.. A note was sent home with your child. Please read it.
    • Thank you parents for caring about your child’s academics and coming to the parent meeting. Please make sure your child is using zearn.com  and exact path every night including the weekend.
    • Next Parent Meeting is Friday, November 30th at 1:30 p.m..

 

  • Homework
  • Math: Zearn.org, Khan Academy (use your RIT score), and Exact Path(based on your math RIT score) -Spend 30 minutes each night. 
  • Succeed Math Book: pages (examples),  (Do-practice problems)
  • Reading: read for 30 minutes your library books, books in book bag, www.epic.com (paid subscription), Exact Path(through Clever on DPS website), iLearn(Benchmark Universe), and google classroom. Read Scholastic News and answer the questions on the back. Reading list is due every Friday.
  • Vocabulary Notebook: Write the definition of 3 words from your word collector. Our goal is to learn 7-10 new words each day and use them in our speaking and writing to expand our vocabulary.
  • Spelling List:
  • article
  • shuffle
  • vehicle
  • sterile
  • bundle
  • pickle
  • mobile
  • hostile
  • bicycle
  • whistle
  • percentile
  • particle
  • sample
  • simple
  • meanwhile
  • region
  • climate
  • culture
  • century
  • supporting

 

  • Social Studies: Identify the 50 states using your map and go on google classroom to read the social studies text there.
  • Book order forms due on Friday.

Weekly Happenings

Monday

11/19

#Kindness Is Cool

Tuesday

11/20

#Kindness Is Cool

Wednesday

11/21

#Kindness Is Cool

No School

Thursday

11/22

#Kindness Is Cool

No School

 

 

Friday

11/23

#Kindness Is Cool

No School

 

 

Ecology Club

School Store

 

Weekly Objectives

Reading:

RI.5.2 Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.

RF.5.4a Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.

RI.5.3 Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

Writing:

W.5.1

Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

  1. Introduce a topic/text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped.
  2. Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details.
  3. Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently, specifically).
  4. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.

W.5.4

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.5.5

With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing.

W.5.10

Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames.

Math:

5.NBT.7 Domain: Number & Operations in Base Ten

Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals to hundredths, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used.

Science:

      CCSS/GLCE(s 5-ESS2-1 Develop a model using an example to describe ways the geosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and/or atmosphere interact.

Social Studies:

U1.1.1:  Use maps to locate peoples in the desert Southwest, the Pacific Northwest, the nomadic nations of the Great Plains, and the woodland peoples east of the Mississippi River (Eastern Woodland).

 5 – U1.1.2:  Compare how American Indians in the desert Southwest and the Pacific Northwest adapted to or modified the environment.

 5 – U1.3.1:  Use maps to locate the major regions of Africa (northern Africa, western Africa, central Africa, eastern Africa, southern Africa).

 5 – U1.3.2:  Describe the life and cultural development of people living in western Africa before the 16th century with respect to economic (the ways people made a living) and family structures, and the growth of states, towns, and trade.

 

 

 

Homework:

Ms. Habhab’s 40 Book Challenge

 

Why Read 20 Minutes at Home?

Student A Reads

Student B Reads

Student C Reads

 20 minutes per day

 5 minutes per day

 1 minute per day

 3,600 minutes per school year

 900 minutes per school year

180 minutes per school year

1,800,000 words per year

 282,000 words per year

 8,000 words per year

Scores in the 90th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 50th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 10th percentile on standardized tests.

If they start reading for 20 minutes per night in Kindergarten, by the end of 6th grade, Student A will have read for the equivalent of 60 school days, Student B will have read for 12 school days, and Student C will have read for 3. (Nagy and Herman, 1987.)

Want to be a better reader? Simply, read!

Why read for 20 min.?

  • All 5th graders in Ms. Habhab’s class will be expected to read at least 40 books this year during independent reading at home.
  • You will be reading 40 (or more) books this year (beginning 9/7/17) and keeping track of the titles and genres on your Reading List sheet.
  • You will be reading from a variety of genres in order to explore books you might not ordinarily read, and to develop an understanding of literary elements, text features, and text structures.
  • Books that have been read (or will be read) in class cannot count, even if the student re-reads the book.
  • Students may ask the teacher, librarian, classmates, or their families for recommendations, but there are no specific title requirements
  • Any book with more than 200 pages will count as 2 books.
  • All books are selected by the student.
  • Select good fit books at your reading level. Use your DRA book graph as your guide and NWEA reading RIT score.
  • Use your Reading notebook to respond to your reading.
  • Each quarter you will be asked to present a “book talk” in front of the class for a grade.
  • Each week I will ask you about what you are reading, which books you have added to your list, which books you abandoned, and which ones you plan to read next.
  • Every Friday, you will turn in a completed Reading List

 

Homework 11-15-18

  • My email is habhabn@dearbornschools.org

 

  • Class News:
    • We have a music concert on December 13th at 2 p.m.. A note was sent home with your child. Please read it.
    • Thank you parents for caring about your child’s academics and coming to the parent meeting. Please make sure your child is using zearn.com  and exact path every night including the weekend.
    • Next Parent Meeting is Friday, November 30th at 1:30 p.m..

 

  • Homework
  • Math: Zearn.org and Exact Path(based on your math RIT score) -Spend 30 minutes each night. 
  • Succeed Math Book: pages 73-74 (examples), 75-75(Do-practice problems)
  • Reading: read for 30 minutes your library books, books in book bag, www.epic.com (paid subscription), Exact Path reading and language usage(through Clever on DPS website), iLearn(Benchmark Universe), and google classroom. Read Scholastic News and answer the questions on the back. Reading list is due every Friday.
  • Vocabulary Notebook: Write the definition of 3 words from your word collector. Our goal is to learn 7-10 new words each day and use them in our speaking and writing to expand our vocabulary.
  • Spelling List:
  • fountain
  • invoice
  • announcement
  • empower
  • voyage
  • coward
  • employ
  • boycott
  • appoint
  • avoid
  • ounces
  • growled
  • scowling
  • moisture
  • destroy
  • biosphere
  • atmosphere
  • hydrosphere
  • geosphere
  • interact

 

  • Social Studies: Identify the 50 states using your map and go on google classroom to read the social studies text there.
  • Book order forms due on Friday.

Weekly Happenings

Monday

11/12

#Kindness Is Cool

Tuesday

11/13

#Kindness Is Cool

Parent Teacher Conferences

Wednesday

11/14

#Kindness Is Cool

Thursday

11/15

#Kindness Is Cool

Parent Teacher Conferences

 

 

Friday

11/16

#Kindness Is Cool

 

 

 

Ecology Club

School Store

 

 

Ms. Habhab’s 40 Book Challenge

 

Why Read 20 Minutes at Home?

Student A Reads

Student B Reads

Student C Reads

 20 minutes per day

 5 minutes per day

 1 minute per day

 3,600 minutes per school year

 900 minutes per school year

180 minutes per school year

1,800,000 words per year

 282,000 words per year

 8,000 words per year

Scores in the 90th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 50th percentile on standardized tests.

Scores in the 10th percentile on standardized tests.

If they start reading for 20 minutes per night in Kindergarten, by the end of 6th grade, Student A will have read for the equivalent of 60 school days, Student B will have read for 12 school days, and Student C will have read for 3. (Nagy and Herman, 1987.)

Want to be a better reader? Simply, read!

Why read for 20 min.?

  • All 5th graders in Ms. Habhab’s class will be expected to read at least 40 books this year during independent reading at home.
  • You will be reading 40 (or more) books this year (beginning 9/7/17) and keeping track of the titles and genres on your Reading List sheet.
  • You will be reading from a variety of genres in order to explore books you might not ordinarily read, and to develop an understanding of literary elements, text features, and text structures.
  • Books that have been read (or will be read) in class cannot count, even if the student re-reads the book.
  • Students may ask the teacher, librarian, classmates, or their families for recommendations, but there are no specific title requirements
  • Any book with more than 200 pages will count as 2 books.
  • All books are selected by the student.
  • Select good fit books at your reading level. Use your DRA book graph as your guide and NWEA reading RIT score.
  • Use your Reading notebook to respond to your reading.
  • Each quarter you will be asked to present a “book talk” in front of the class for a grade.
  • Each week I will ask you about what you are reading, which books you have added to your list, which books you abandoned, and which ones you plan to read next.
  • Every Friday, you will turn in a completed Reading List

 

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