Important!!

STEM Middle School would like to thank everyone for their interest in attending our school for the 2019-2020 school year.  To answer the most popular question we hear, there is no application process in order to be considered for STEM for those students who attend Dearborn Public Schools; instead, invitations will be sent out to all those 5th grade students in the district that are found to be eligible.  To be eligible students must have the following:

–       A Winter NWEA math score in the 85th or higher percentile.

–       A Winter NWEA reading score in the 85th or higher percentile.

–       A Winter NWEA science score in the 85th or higher percentile.

–       ADVANCED on the 2018 ELA and Math M-STEP.

 Our hope is to have invitations sent out to all eligible 5th grade students by the end of February.  From there, students who receive an invitation and indicate that they are interested in actually attending STEM in the fall, will be selected by lottery.  We will accept a final number of 60 students in to our 2019-2020 6th grade class.

If you live within the Dearborn Public Schools, and do not currently attend a Dearborn Public School, OR you are currently a 6th or 7th grader and would like to apply for a POSSIBLE empty slot, an application will be available on the STEM Middle School website (https://stem.dearbornschools.org/) under the tab “ADMISSIONS” starting in mid-February.   Invitations will be sent out to grade students that meet the below standards:

–       A Winter NWEA math score in the 85th or higher percentile.

–       A Winter NWEA reading score in the 85th or higher percentile.

–       A Winter NWEA science score in the 85th or higher percentile.

–       ADVANCED on the 2018 ELA and Math M-STEP

 Once again, thank you for your interest in STEM Middle School – a 2018 National Blue Ribbon School for Academic Excellence.

Oussama Baydoun – Assistant Principal

313-827-1904 Phone

STEM/MBCC/DCMST/MAGNET

2018 National Blue Ribbon School 

Students First – Inspire, Educate, Celebrate

Week of February 4, 2019

Welcome Back!

Late start Wednesday February 6!!

Reading: RI 5.9 Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably;

Reading – RL.5.1Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

Reading – RL.5.4URL  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes.

Spelling: 

interdependent,  requirement, frequent, impatient, absent, excellent, independent, compliment

resident, innocent, 

Content Words: separatists, Plymouth, compact,democratic, religious

Writing: Writing – Unit 7

W.5.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.
  3. Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events.
  4. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or event.

Math

In Topic B, place value understanding moves toward understanding the distributive property via area models, which are used to generate and record the partial products (5.OA.A.1, 5.OA.A.2) of the standard algorithm (5.NBT.B.5).

Topic C, moves students from whole numbers to multiplication with decimals, again using place value as a guide to reason and make estimations about products (5.NBT.B.7).

 

In Topic D, students explore multiplication as a method for expressing equivalent measures. For example, they multiply to convert between meters and centimeters or ounces and cups with measurements in both whole number and decimal form (5.MD.A.1).

Topics E through H provide a similar sequence for division.

Topic E begins concretely with place value disks as an introduction to division with multi-digit whole numbers (5.NBT.B.6).  In the same lesson, 420 ÷ 60 is interpreted as 420 ÷ 10 ÷ 6. Next, students round dividends and two-digit divisors to nearby multiples of 10 in order to estimate single-digit quotients (e.g., 431 ÷ 58 ≈ 420 ÷ 60 = 7) and then multi-digit quotients. This work is done horizontally, outside the context of the written vertical method.

In Topic F, a series of lessons lead students to divide multi-digit dividends by two-digit divisors using the written vertical method. Each lesson moves to a new level of difficulty with a sequence beginning with divisors that are multiples of 10 to non-multiples of 10. Two instructional days are devoted to single-digit quotients with and without remainders before progressing to two- and three-digit quotients (5.NBT.B.6).

 

Science ESS1.A: The Universe and its Stars

 

 

 

Rocks

ESS1.A: The Universe and its Stars

 

Social Studies;

Lesson 4 Religious Freedom and Early New England SettlementsURL

 

Lesson 5 The Development of the New England ColoniesURL

 

Lesson 6 Settlements in the Middle: New Amsterdam and Quaker SettlementsURL

 

 

 

 

January 24th

Plate Tectonics

  1.  What are plate tectonics?
  2. In your own words summarize what happens during an earthquake.
  3. What is volcanic island and how it is formed?
  4. Where would you find the newest rock on earth? Why would it be found here?
  5. Why do you think scientists are trying to come up with new ways of predicting when and where earthquakes will occur?
  6. Draw a picture and label the parts.

Week of January 14th

Hope you enjoyed your weekend!!

We will continue with NWEA testing!

Please make sure the students are sleeping on time and eating healthy breakfast.

Half a day on Friday Janurary 18th!

No School Monday January 21st!!

 

Spelling:

wreckage, disguises, column, chemical, foreign, wrinkle, moisten, character, condemn, resign

Content Words: colony, settlement, plantation, freedom, employment

 

Week of Janurary 7th

Welcome Back !! Happy New Year!!

NWEA Science is Tuesday!

NWEA Language is Wednesday!

ELA

RI 5.9 Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably;RI 5.1RI5.1Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

 

Math

(5.NBT.B.5).Fluently multiply multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.

Spelling

recession, concession, vision, comprehension, conclusion, possession, permission, profession, dimension, suspension

colonization, diversified, economic, migration, primary.

Social Studies

Lesson 1 From Exploration to ColonizationURL

Week of December 17th!!

Hope you had a restful weekend!!

Holiday store 12/18-12/20!

Spelling test on Friday!

Social Studies test on Thursday!

 

ELA

RI.5.8 RI 5.8 – Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s)

Writing

W.5.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

a  Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; including formatting.

  1. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, and information and examples related to the topic.
  2. Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g. in contrast, especially).
  3. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
  4. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.

 

W.5.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

 

W.5.5  With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing.

Spelling

prescription, subscription, introduction, tradition, condition, description, condensation, contribution, nomination, election, celebration

Content Words:  climate, pollution, deforestation, glaciers

 

Math:

Module 2(5.OA.A.1).Use parentheses, brackets, or braces in numerical expressions, and evaluate expressions with these symbols.5.OA.A.2 Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers, and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them. For example, express the calculation “add 8 and 7, then multiply by 2” as 2 × (8 + 7). Recognize that 3 × (18932 + 921) is three times as large as 18932 + 921, without having to calculate the indicated sum or product.

Science :  collecting information on planet EARTH

Social Studies: End of unit review

Week of December 10th!

Hope you had a restful weekend!

 

  • Math Test Tuesday
  • Late Start Wednesday
  • Music Concert Thursday at 10:00!
  • Math nigh Thursday 5:00-6:30
  • Spelling Test Friday

 

Reading: RL5.9 Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics described. RI.5.1/  RI.5.3 Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.RI.5.8 RI 5.8 – Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s)

Spelling: 

forgetting, expelling, transferring, equipping, regretting,  compelling, dropping, referring, shopping, omitting.

Content words: Mercury, Venus, Pluto, Mars, Neptune, Jupiter

Math (5.OA.A.1). Use parentheses, brackets, or braces in numerical expressions, and evaluate expressions with these symbols. (5.OA 2)Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers, and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them. For example, express the calculation “add 8 and 7, then multiply by 2” as 2 × (8 + 7). Recognize that 3 × (18932 + 921) is three times as large as 18932 + 921, without having to calculate the indicated sum or product.

Social Studies:

Social Studies unit 3 colonization and settlement

Science:

  1. Describe how the length of day changes with the seasons.
  2. Describe how the sunrise and sunset changes through the year.
  3. Explain the factors that cause Earth’s seasons.
  4. Explain the motion of the Earth and its relationship to the sun.

Week of December 3rd!

Hope you had a nice weekend!

Math End of the Module test is this Thursday!

Social Studies opinion paper is due this Friday!

 

ELA: 

RL5.6 Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described

RL5.9 Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics described.

Spelling: 

admitted, controlled, flagged, referred, tripped, occurred,  omitted, concurred, stopped, strapped,

Content words: gravity, planets, solar, orbit, revolve

Writer’s Workshop:

W.5.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 

W.5.5 With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

W.5.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Math: CCSS 5.NBT.7 Domain: Number & Operations in Base Ten

Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals to hundredths, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used.

Social Studies

A case study Is Christopher Columbus a Hero or a Villain

http://www.mrsplavichsclass.com/2016/09/christopher-columbus-hero-or-villain/

 

 

Week of November 26th!!

Hope you enjoyed your Thanksgiving break!!

Daily Five

RL 5.5 Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem.

 

RL5.6 Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are dRL  RL5.9 Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics escribed.

W.W.

W.5.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations.
  3. Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the sequence of events.
  4. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or event.

Spelling

airproof, afternoon, lagoon, fireproofing, raccoon, foolproof, hooligan, pontoon, proofread, blooming,

 exchange, slavery, encounter, destroyed, mines

Social Studies

Lesson 8: Encounters and ExchangesLesson 8: Supplemental Materials

Science

Unit 2-Space-solar system

Motion slides