Pacing Guide

6th grade companion GLECS

Environmental Science

  • Identify and describe examples of populations, communities, and ecosystems including the Great Lakes region.
  • Describe common patterns of relationships between and among populations (competition, parasitism, symbiosis, predator/prey).
  • Explain how two populations of organisms can be mutually beneficial and how that can lead to interdependency.
  • Predict and describe how changes in one population might affect other populations based upon their relationships in the food web.
  • Identify the living (biotic) and nonliving (abiotic) components of an ecosystem.
  • Identify and describe examples of populations, communities, and ecosystems including the Great Lakes region.
  • Describe common patterns of relationships between and among populations (competition, parasitism, symbiosis, predator/prey).
  • Explain how two populations of organisms can be mutually beneficial and how that can lead to interdependency.
  • Predict and describe how changes in one population might affect other populations based upon their relationships in the food web.
  • Identify the living (biotic) and nonliving (abiotic) components of an ecosystem.
  • Identify the factors in an ecosystem that influence changes in population size.
  • Describe how human beings are part of the ecosystem of the Earth and that human activity can purposefully, or accidentally, alter the balance in ecosystems.
  • Predict and describe possible consequences of overpopulation of organisms, including humans, (for example: species extinction, resource depletion, climate change, pollution).

Physical Science

  • Identify kinetic or potential energy in everyday situations (for example: stretched rubber band, objects in motion, ball on a hill, food energy).
  • Demonstrate the transformation between potential and kinetic energy in simple mechanical systems (for example: roller coasters, pendulums).
  • Explain how different forms of energy can be transferred from one place to another by radiation, conduction, or convection.
  • Illustrate how energy can be transferred while no net loss or gain of energy is lost or gained in the transfer.
  • Describe and illustrate changes in state, in terms of the arrangement and relative motion of the atoms or molecules.
  • Explain how mass is conserved as a substance changes from state to state in a closed system.

Earth science

    • Explain plate tectonic movement and that the lithospheric plates move centimeters each year.
    • Demonstrate how major geological events (earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, mountain building) result from these plate motions.
    • Describe layers of the Earth as a lithosphere (crust and upper mantle), convecting mantle, and dense metallic core.
    • Describe the Earth as a magnet and compare the magnetic properties of the Earth to that of a natural or manufactured magnet.
    • Explain how a compass works using the magnetic field of the Earth, and how a compass is used for navigation on land
    • Compare and contrast the formation of rock types (igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary) and demonstrate the similarities and differences using the rock cycle model.
    • Explain how physical and chemical weathering lead to erosion and the formation of soils and sediments.
    • Explain how waves, wind, water, and glacier movement, shape and reshape the land surface of the Earth by eroding rock in some areas and depositing sediments in other areas.

    • Describe how soil is a mixture made up of weather-eroded rock and decomposed organic material, water, and air.

    • Compare and contrast different soil samples based on particle size.

    • Explain how rocks and fossils are used to understand the age and geological history of the earth (timelines and relative dating, rock layers).

  • Explain how Earth processes (erosion, mountain building, and glacier movement) are used for the measurement of geologic time through observing rock layers.

  • Describe how fossils provide important evidence of how life and environmental conditions have changed.